UTeaChattanooga Course Sequences

 

Semester 1

Semester 2

Semester 3

Semester 4

Semester 5

Semester 6

Semester 7

Semester 8

Freshman Course Sequence

Step 1Step 1 is a 1-credit course which allows students to explore teaching as a career and for which UTC offers a tuition rebate. Following an introduction to the theory and practice behind excellent inquiry-based science and mathematics instruction, students teach lessons in elementary classrooms to obtain firsthand experience in planning and implementation. Master teachers-Step 1 instructors chosen for their experience and success in secondary classrooms-provide students direct exposure to people who love teaching and view it as a rewarding career choice. Mentor teachers at the low-socioeconomic schools where students teach their prepared lessons demonstrate effective teaching techniques and classroom management skills, giving the future teachers a true taste of working in a supportive, diverse educational setting.

Step 2In Step 2, the second 1-credit course for which UTeaChattanooga offers a tuition rebate, students continue developing the lesson planning skills learned in Step 1 as they become familiar with exemplary middle school science curricula. After observing lessons being taught in a local school district classroom, students plan and teach three inquiry-based lessons to sixth, seventh, or eighth graders. Middle school science or mathematics classrooms are selected both for the diversity of the student body and the quality of the classroom teachers, who serve as mentors for the Step 2 students assigned to them. By the end of Step 2, students are usually able to make an informed decision about whether to pursue teacher certification through the UTeaChattanooga program.

Knowing & LearningKnowing and Learning in Mathematics and Science is the first in a sequence of three, 3-credit professional development courses in the UTeaChattanooga program. It is followed by Classroom Interactions and Project-Based Instruction. Knowing and Learning is more than simply a general survey of theories in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) fields, its goal being for students to construct a model of knowing and learning that will guide their future classroom practice. This course revolves around an exploration of Essential Questions specifically relevant to teaching mathematics and science. Students begin by considering what standards for knowing are to be used, how knowing and learning are structured, and how what is known changes and develops. Ultimately, students must think about the tensions between general, cross-disciplinary characterizations of knowing (e.g., intelligence) and the specifics of coming to understand powerful ideas in mathematics and science.

Classroom InteractionsClassroom Interactions is typically the fourth UTeaChattanooga course taken by students and the second in a series of three, 3-credit professional development courses. It follows Knowing and Learning and precedes Project-Based Instruction. Classroom Interactions builds on the Knowing and Learning course, moving from a focus on thinking and learning to a focus on teaching and learning. The course is centered on a close examination of the interplay between teachers, students, and content, and how these types of interactions enable students to develop deep conceptual understanding. Prospective teachers are also introduced to ways in which curriculum and technology are used in classroom settings to build interrelationships among teachers and students. They are taught how content and pedagogy combine to make effective teaching.

PerspectivesPerspectives in Mathematics and Science is a 3 credit upper-division course designed to meet the unique needs of future secondary science and mathematics teachers. It is one of the specially designed content courses in the UTeaChattanooga sequence (others include Mathematical Models, Functions, and Applications and Research Methods). The course has several interlocking purposes: it is intended to help future math and science teachers learn how to think about math and science "from the outside"-to ask questions about what scientists and mathematicians do and why, about where science and technology came from and how they got to be so important in the world today, and about what kinds of questions scientists and mathematicians have tried to answer and why; it is designed to strengthen students' skills in the liberal arts, including sophisticated research and information analysis, fluent writing, and substantive argument; it requires students to put to work the insights and skills they have learned in science and math pedagogy classes by designing secondary school lesson plans that are built around events and concepts from the history of science and mathematics.

Research MethodsResearch Methods is a three-hour course in the required UTeaChattanooga sequence. It is one of several content courses specially designed to meet the needs of future secondary mathematics and science teachers (others include Perspectives in Mathematics and Science and Mathematical Models, Functions, and Applications). The goals of the course are: to provide UTeaChattanooga students with the tools that scientists use to solve scientific problems; to give students the opportunity to use these tools in a laboratory setting; to make students aware of how scientists communicate with each other through peer-reviewed scientific literature; to enable students to understand how scientists develop new knowledge and insights, the most important of which are eventually presented in textbooks and taught in conventional science classes.

Project Based InstructionProject-Based Instruction (PBI) is the capstone course in the sequence of professional development courses (Knowing and Learning, Classroom Interactions, and PBI) UTeaChattanooga students take prior to Apprentice Teaching and is 3 credits. PBI is the course in which a number of the major principles and themes of the UTeaChattanooga program-integration of mathematics and science content; infusion of technology in representation, analysis, modeling, assessment and contextualization of content; immersion in intensive field-based experiences; and a focus on designing equitable learning environments-are synthesized as the students develop an intellectually challenging project-based instructional unit.

Apprentice TeachingThe purpose of Apprentice Teaching is to offer UTeaChattanooga students a culminating experience that provides them with the tools needed for their first teaching jobs. In Apprentice Teaching, students are immersed in the expectations, processes, and rewards of teaching. When making placements, UTeaChattanooga master teachers consider each apprentice teacher's characteristics and abilities as well as the cooperating teacher's teaching and mentoring styles. The hope is that the complementary strengths of the UTeaChattanooga apprentice teacher and cooperating teacher will generate a synergism that benefits both people professionally. Embedded within Apprentice Teaching is a seminar component which is taught by master teachers, who share their teaching experiences and facilitate discussions, helping apprentice teachers develop their own successful teaching identities. The Apprentice Teaching seminar embedded within the Apprentice Teaching course, provides a supportive environment where apprentice teachers share their experiences and work on solutions to difficulties they are experiencing. The seminar is a good forum for students to get the guidance they consistently want on classroom management. The seminar objectives and activities are aligned with Tennessee Teacher Licensure Standards. The apprentice teachers demonstrate that they meet the state standards by preparing and submitting a final portfolio. Apprentice teachers concentrate on teaching lessons each week in which they demonstrate competency of particular state standards. Apprentice Teaching is a six-credit-hour course.

 

 

Step 1Step 1 is a 1-credit course which allows students to explore teaching as a career and for which UTC offers a tuition rebate. Following an introduction to the theory and practice behind excellent inquiry-based science and mathematics instruction, students teach lessons in elementary classrooms to obtain firsthand experience in planning and implementation. Master teachers-Step 1 instructors chosen for their experience and success in secondary classrooms-provide students direct exposure to people who love teaching and view it as a rewarding career choice. Mentor teachers at the low-socioeconomic schools where students teach their prepared lessons demonstrate effective teaching techniques and classroom management skills, giving the future teachers a true taste of working in a supportive, diverse educational setting.

 

Step 2In Step 2, the second 1-credit course for which UTeaChattanooga offers a tuition rebate, students continue developing the lesson planning skills learned in Step 1 as they become familiar with exemplary middle school science curricula. After observing lessons being taught in a local school district classroom, students plan and teach three inquiry-based lessons to sixth, seventh, or eighth graders. Middle school science or mathematics classrooms are selected both for the diversity of the student body and the quality of the classroom teachers, who serve as mentors for the Step 2 students assigned to them. By the end of Step 2, students are usually able to make an informed decision about whether to pursue teacher certification through the UTeaChattanooga program.

Knowing & LearningKnowing and Learning in Mathematics and Science is the first in a sequence of three, 3-credit professional development courses in the UTeaChattanooga program. It is followed by Classroom Interactions and Project-Based Instruction. Knowing and Learning is more than simply a general survey of theories in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) fields, its goal being for students to construct a model of knowing and learning that will guide their future classroom practice. This course revolves around an exploration of Essential Questions specifically relevant to teaching mathematics and science. Students begin by considering what standards for knowing are to be used, how knowing and learning are structured, and how what is known changes and develops. Ultimately, students must think about the tensions between general, cross-disciplinary characterizations of knowing (e.g., intelligence) and the specifics of coming to understand powerful ideas in mathematics and science.

Classroom InteractionsClassroom Interactions is typically the fourth UTeaChattanooga course taken by students and the second in a series of three, 3-credit professional development courses. It follows Knowing and Learning and precedes Project-Based Instruction. Classroom Interactions builds on the Knowing and Learning course, moving from a focus on thinking and learning to a focus on teaching and learning. The course is centered on a close examination of the interplay between teachers, students, and content, and how these types of interactions enable students to develop deep conceptual understanding. Prospective teachers are also introduced to ways in which curriculum and technology are used in classroom settings to build interrelationships among teachers and students. They are taught how content and pedagogy combine to make effective teaching.

PerspectivesPerspectives in Mathematics and Science is a 3 credit upper-division course designed to meet the unique needs of future secondary science and mathematics teachers. It is one of the specially designed content courses in the UTeaChattanooga sequence (others include Mathematical Models, Functions, and Applications and Research Methods). The course has several interlocking purposes: it is intended to help future math and science teachers learn how to think about math and science "from the outside"-to ask questions about what scientists and mathematicians do and why, about where science and technology came from and how they got to be so important in the world today, and about what kinds of questions scientists and mathematicians have tried to answer and why; it is designed to strengthen students' skills in the liberal arts, including sophisticated research and information analysis, fluent writing, and substantive argument; it requires students to put to work the insights and skills they have learned in science and math pedagogy classes by designing secondary school lesson plans that are built around events and concepts from the history of science and mathematics.

Research MethodsResearch Methods is a three-hour course in the required UTeaChattanooga sequence. It is one of several content courses specially designed to meet the needs of future secondary mathematics and science teachers (others include Perspectives in Mathematics and Science and Mathematical Models, Functions, and Applications). The goals of the course are: to provide UTeaChattanooga students with the tools that scientists use to solve scientific problems; to give students the opportunity to use these tools in a laboratory setting; to make students aware of how scientists communicate with each other through peer-reviewed scientific literature; to enable students to understand how scientists develop new knowledge and insights, the most important of which are eventually presented in textbooks and taught in conventional science classes.

Project Based InstructionProject-Based Instruction (PBI) is the capstone course in the sequence of professional development courses (Knowing and Learning, Classroom Interactions, and PBI) UTeaChattanooga students take prior to Apprentice Teaching and is 3 credits. PBI is the course in which a number of the major principles and themes of the UTeaChattanooga program-integration of mathematics and science content; infusion of technology in representation, analysis, modeling, assessment and contextualization of content; immersion in intensive field-based experiences; and a focus on designing equitable learning environments-are synthesized as the students develop an intellectually challenging project-based instructional unit.

Apprentice TeachingThe purpose of Apprentice Teaching is to offer UTeaChattanooga students a culminating experience that provides them with the tools needed for their first teaching jobs. In Apprentice Teaching, students are immersed in the expectations, processes, and rewards of teaching. When making placements, UTeaChattanooga master teachers consider each apprentice teacher's characteristics and abilities as well as the cooperating teacher's teaching and mentoring styles. The hope is that the complementary strengths of the UTeaChattanooga apprentice teacher and cooperating teacher will generate a synergism that benefits both people professionally. Embedded within Apprentice Teaching is a seminar component which is taught by master teachers, who share their teaching experiences and facilitate discussions, helping apprentice teachers develop their own successful teaching identities. The Apprentice Teaching seminar embedded within the Apprentice Teaching course, provides a supportive environment where apprentice teachers share their experiences and work on solutions to difficulties they are experiencing. The seminar is a good forum for students to get the guidance they consistently want on classroom management. The seminar objectives and activities are aligned with Tennessee Teacher Licensure Standards. The apprentice teachers demonstrate that they meet the state standards by preparing and submitting a final portfolio. Apprentice teachers concentrate on teaching lessons each week in which they demonstrate competency of particular state standards. Apprentice Teaching is a six-credit-hour course.

 

 

Sophomore Course Sequence

Step 1Step 1 is a 1-credit course which allows students to explore teaching as a career and for which UTC offers a tuition rebate. Following an introduction to the theory and practice behind excellent inquiry-based science and mathematics instruction, students teach lessons in elementary classrooms to obtain firsthand experience in planning and implementation. Master teachers-Step 1 instructors chosen for their experience and success in secondary classrooms-provide students direct exposure to people who love teaching and view it as a rewarding career choice. Mentor teachers at the low-socioeconomic schools where students teach their prepared lessons demonstrate effective teaching techniques and classroom management skills, giving the future teachers a true taste of working in a supportive, diverse educational setting.

Step 2In Step 2, the second 1-credit course for which UTeaChattanooga offers a tuition rebate, students continue developing the lesson planning skills learned in Step 1 as they become familiar with exemplary middle school science curricula. After observing lessons being taught in a local school district classroom, students plan and teach three inquiry-based lessons to sixth, seventh, or eighth graders. Middle school science or mathematics classrooms are selected both for the diversity of the student body and the quality of the classroom teachers, who serve as mentors for the Step 2 students assigned to them. By the end of Step 2, students are usually able to make an informed decision about whether to pursue teacher certification through the UTeaChattanooga program.

Knowing & LearningKnowing and Learning in Mathematics and Science is the first in a sequence of three, 3-credit professional development courses in the UTeaChattanooga program. It is followed by Classroom Interactions and Project-Based Instruction. Knowing and Learning is more than simply a general survey of theories in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) fields, its goal being for students to construct a model of knowing and learning that will guide their future classroom practice. This course revolves around an exploration of Essential Questions specifically relevant to teaching mathematics and science. Students begin by considering what standards for knowing are to be used, how knowing and learning are structured, and how what is known changes and develops. Ultimately, students must think about the tensions between general, cross-disciplinary characterizations of knowing (e.g., intelligence) and the specifics of coming to understand powerful ideas in mathematics and science.

Classroom InteractionsClassroom Interactions is typically the fourth UTeaChattanooga course taken by students and the second in a series of three, 3-credit professional development courses. It follows Knowing and Learning and precedes Project-Based Instruction. Classroom Interactions builds on the Knowing and Learning course, moving from a focus on thinking and learning to a focus on teaching and learning. The course is centered on a close examination of the interplay between teachers, students, and content, and how these types of interactions enable students to develop deep conceptual understanding. Prospective teachers are also introduced to ways in which curriculum and technology are used in classroom settings to build interrelationships among teachers and students. They are taught how content and pedagogy combine to make effective teaching.

PerspectivesPerspectives in Mathematics and Science is a 3 credit upper-division course designed to meet the unique needs of future secondary science and mathematics teachers. It is one of the specially designed content courses in the UTeaChattanooga sequence (others include Mathematical Models, Functions, and Applications and Research Methods). The course has several interlocking purposes: it is intended to help future math and science teachers learn how to think about math and science "from the outside"-to ask questions about what scientists and mathematicians do and why, about where science and technology came from and how they got to be so important in the world today, and about what kinds of questions scientists and mathematicians have tried to answer and why; it is designed to strengthen students' skills in the liberal arts, including sophisticated research and information analysis, fluent writing, and substantive argument; it requires students to put to work the insights and skills they have learned in science and math pedagogy classes by designing secondary school lesson plans that are built around events and concepts from the history of science and mathematics.

Research MethodsResearch Methods is a three-hour course in the required UTeaChattanooga sequence. It is one of several content courses specially designed to meet the needs of future secondary mathematics and science teachers (others include Perspectives in Mathematics and Science and Mathematical Models, Functions, and Applications). The goals of the course are: to provide UTeaChattanooga students with the tools that scientists use to solve scientific problems; to give students the opportunity to use these tools in a laboratory setting; to make students aware of how scientists communicate with each other through peer-reviewed scientific literature; to enable students to understand how scientists develop new knowledge and insights, the most important of which are eventually presented in textbooks and taught in conventional science classes.

Project Based InstructionProject-Based Instruction (PBI) is the capstone course in the sequence of professional development courses (Knowing and Learning, Classroom Interactions, and PBI) UTeaChattanooga students take prior to Apprentice Teaching and is 3 credits. PBI is the course in which a number of the major principles and themes of the UTeaChattanooga program-integration of mathematics and science content; infusion of technology in representation, analysis, modeling, assessment and contextualization of content; immersion in intensive field-based experiences; and a focus on designing equitable learning environments-are synthesized as the students develop an intellectually challenging project-based instructional unit.

Apprentice TeachingThe purpose of Apprentice Teaching is to offer UTeaChattanooga students a culminating experience that provides them with the tools needed for their first teaching jobs. In Apprentice Teaching, students are immersed in the expectations, processes, and rewards of teaching. When making placements, UTeaChattanooga master teachers consider each apprentice teacher's characteristics and abilities as well as the cooperating teacher's teaching and mentoring styles. The hope is that the complementary strengths of the UTeaChattanooga apprentice teacher and cooperating teacher will generate a synergism that benefits both people professionally. Embedded within Apprentice Teaching is a seminar component which is taught by master teachers, who share their teaching experiences and facilitate discussions, helping apprentice teachers develop their own successful teaching identities. The Apprentice Teaching seminar embedded within the Apprentice Teaching course, provides a supportive environment where apprentice teachers share their experiences and work on solutions to difficulties they are experiencing. The seminar is a good forum for students to get the guidance they consistently want on classroom management. The seminar objectives and activities are aligned with Tennessee Teacher Licensure Standards. The apprentice teachers demonstrate that they meet the state standards by preparing and submitting a final portfolio. Apprentice teachers concentrate on teaching lessons each week in which they demonstrate competency of particular state standards. Apprentice Teaching is a six-credit-hour course.

 

 

 

Step 1Step 1 is a 1-credit course which allows students to explore teaching as a career and for which UTC offers a tuition rebate. Following an introduction to the theory and practice behind excellent inquiry-based science and mathematics instruction, students teach lessons in elementary classrooms to obtain firsthand experience in planning and implementation. Master teachers-Step 1 instructors chosen for their experience and success in secondary classrooms-provide students direct exposure to people who love teaching and view it as a rewarding career choice. Mentor teachers at the low-socioeconomic schools where students teach their prepared lessons demonstrate effective teaching techniques and classroom management skills, giving the future teachers a true taste of working in a supportive, diverse educational setting.

Step 2In Step 2, the second 1-credit course for which UTeaChattanooga offers a tuition rebate, students continue developing the lesson planning skills learned in Step 1 as they become familiar with exemplary middle school science curricula. After observing lessons being taught in a local school district classroom, students plan and teach three inquiry-based lessons to sixth, seventh, or eighth graders. Middle school science or mathematics classrooms are selected both for the diversity of the student body and the quality of the classroom teachers, who serve as mentors for the Step 2 students assigned to them. By the end of Step 2, students are usually able to make an informed decision about whether to pursue teacher certification through the UTeaChattanooga program.

Knowing & LearningKnowing and Learning in Mathematics and Science is the first in a sequence of three, 3-credit professional development courses in the UTeaChattanooga program. It is followed by Classroom Interactions and Project-Based Instruction. Knowing and Learning is more than simply a general survey of theories in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) fields, its goal being for students to construct a model of knowing and learning that will guide their future classroom practice. This course revolves around an exploration of Essential Questions specifically relevant to teaching mathematics and science. Students begin by considering what standards for knowing are to be used, how knowing and learning are structured, and how what is known changes and develops. Ultimately, students must think about the tensions between general, cross-disciplinary characterizations of knowing (e.g., intelligence) and the specifics of coming to understand powerful ideas in mathematics and science.

PerspectivesPerspectives in Mathematics and Science is a 3 credit upper-division course designed to meet the unique needs of future secondary science and mathematics teachers. It is one of the specially designed content courses in the UTeaChattanooga sequence (others include Mathematical Models, Functions, and Applications and Research Methods). The course has several interlocking purposes: it is intended to help future math and science teachers learn how to think about math and science "from the outside"-to ask questions about what scientists and mathematicians do and why, about where science and technology came from and how they got to be so important in the world today, and about what kinds of questions scientists and mathematicians have tried to answer and why; it is designed to strengthen students' skills in the liberal arts, including sophisticated research and information analysis, fluent writing, and substantive argument; it requires students to put to work the insights and skills they have learned in science and math pedagogy classes by designing secondary school lesson plans that are built around events and concepts from the history of science and mathematics.

Classroom InteractionsClassroom Interactions is typically the fourth UTeaChattanooga course taken by students and the second in a series of three, 3-credit professional development courses. It follows Knowing and Learning and precedes Project-Based Instruction. Classroom Interactions builds on the Knowing and Learning course, moving from a focus on thinking and learning to a focus on teaching and learning. The course is centered on a close examination of the interplay between teachers, students, and content, and how these types of interactions enable students to develop deep conceptual understanding. Prospective teachers are also introduced to ways in which curriculum and technology are used in classroom settings to build interrelationships among teachers and students. They are taught how content and pedagogy combine to make effective teaching.

Research MethodsResearch Methods is a three-hour course in the required UTeaChattanooga sequence. It is one of several content courses specially designed to meet the needs of future secondary mathematics and science teachers (others include Perspectives in Mathematics and Science and Mathematical Models, Functions, and Applications). The goals of the course are: to provide UTeaChattanooga students with the tools that scientists use to solve scientific problems; to give students the opportunity to use these tools in a laboratory setting; to make students aware of how scientists communicate with each other through peer-reviewed scientific literature; to enable students to understand how scientists develop new knowledge and insights, the most important of which are eventually presented in textbooks and taught in conventional science classes.

Project Based InstructionProject-Based Instruction (PBI) is the capstone course in the sequence of professional development courses (Knowing and Learning, Classroom Interactions, and PBI) UTeaChattanooga students take prior to Apprentice Teaching and is 3 credits. PBI is the course in which a number of the major principles and themes of the UTeaChattanooga program-integration of mathematics and science content; infusion of technology in representation, analysis, modeling, assessment and contextualization of content; immersion in intensive field-based experiences; and a focus on designing equitable learning environments-are synthesized as the students develop an intellectually challenging project-based instructional unit.

Apprentice TeachingThe purpose of Apprentice Teaching is to offer UTeaChattanooga students a culminating experience that provides them with the tools needed for their first teaching jobs. In Apprentice Teaching, students are immersed in the expectations, processes, and rewards of teaching. When making placements, UTeaChattanooga master teachers consider each apprentice teacher's characteristics and abilities as well as the cooperating teacher's teaching and mentoring styles. The hope is that the complementary strengths of the UTeaChattanooga apprentice teacher and cooperating teacher will generate a synergism that benefits both people professionally. Embedded within Apprentice Teaching is a seminar component which is taught by master teachers, who share their teaching experiences and facilitate discussions, helping apprentice teachers develop their own successful teaching identities. The Apprentice Teaching seminar embedded within the Apprentice Teaching course, provides a supportive environment where apprentice teachers share their experiences and work on solutions to difficulties they are experiencing. The seminar is a good forum for students to get the guidance they consistently want on classroom management. The seminar objectives and activities are aligned with Tennessee Teacher Licensure Standards. The apprentice teachers demonstrate that they meet the state standards by preparing and submitting a final portfolio. Apprentice teachers concentrate on teaching lessons each week in which they demonstrate competency of particular state standards. Apprentice Teaching is a six-credit-hour course.

 

 

 

Sophomore/

Junior Course Sequence

Step 1Step 1 is a 1-credit course which allows students to explore teaching as a career and for which UTC offers a tuition rebate. Following an introduction to the theory and practice behind excellent inquiry-based science and mathematics instruction, students teach lessons in elementary classrooms to obtain firsthand experience in planning and implementation. Master teachers-Step 1 instructors chosen for their experience and success in secondary classrooms-provide students direct exposure to people who love teaching and view it as a rewarding career choice. Mentor teachers at the low-socioeconomic schools where students teach their prepared lessons demonstrate effective teaching techniques and classroom management skills, giving the future teachers a true taste of working in a supportive, diverse educational setting. / 2 Combo Course

Knowing & LearningKnowing and Learning in Mathematics and Science is the first in a sequence of three, 3-credit professional development courses in the UTeaChattanooga program. It is followed by Classroom Interactions and Project-Based Instruction. Knowing and Learning is more than simply a general survey of theories in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) fields, its goal being for students to construct a model of knowing and learning that will guide their future classroom practice. This course revolves around an exploration of Essential Questions specifically relevant to teaching mathematics and science. Students begin by considering what standards for knowing are to be used, how knowing and learning are structured, and how what is known changes and develops. Ultimately, students must think about the tensions between general, cross-disciplinary characterizations of knowing (e.g., intelligence) and the specifics of coming to understand powerful ideas in mathematics and science.

Classroom InteractionsClassroom Interactions is typically the fourth UTeaChattanooga course taken by students and the second in a series of three, 3-credit professional development courses. It follows Knowing and Learning and precedes Project-Based Instruction. Classroom Interactions builds on the Knowing and Learning course, moving from a focus on thinking and learning to a focus on teaching and learning. The course is centered on a close examination of the interplay between teachers, students, and content, and how these types of interactions enable students to develop deep conceptual understanding. Prospective teachers are also introduced to ways in which curriculum and technology are used in classroom settings to build interrelationships among teachers and students. They are taught how content and pedagogy combine to make effective teaching.

PerspectivesPerspectives in Mathematics and Science is a 3 credit upper-division course designed to meet the unique needs of future secondary science and mathematics teachers. It is one of the specially designed content courses in the UTeaChattanooga sequence (others include Mathematical Models, Functions, and Applications and Research Methods). The course has several interlocking purposes: it is intended to help future math and science teachers learn how to think about math and science "from the outside"-to ask questions about what scientists and mathematicians do and why, about where science and technology came from and how they got to be so important in the world today, and about what kinds of questions scientists and mathematicians have tried to answer and why; it is designed to strengthen students' skills in the liberal arts, including sophisticated research and information analysis, fluent writing, and substantive argument; it requires students to put to work the insights and skills they have learned in science and math pedagogy classes by designing secondary school lesson plans that are built around events and concepts from the history of science and mathematics.

 

Research MethodsResearch Methods is a three-hour course in the required UTeaChattanooga sequence. It is one of several content courses specially designed to meet the needs of future secondary mathematics and science teachers (others include Perspectives in Mathematics and Science and Mathematical Models, Functions, and Applications). The goals of the course are: to provide UTeaChattanooga students with the tools that scientists use to solve scientific problems; to give students the opportunity to use these tools in a laboratory setting; to make students aware of how scientists communicate with each other through peer-reviewed scientific literature; to enable students to understand how scientists develop new knowledge and insights, the most important of which are eventually presented in textbooks and taught in conventional science classes.

Project Based InstructionProject-Based Instruction (PBI) is the capstone course in the sequence of professional development courses (Knowing and Learning, Classroom Interactions, and PBI) UTeaChattanooga students take prior to Apprentice Teaching and is 3 credits. PBI is the course in which a number of the major principles and themes of the UTeaChattanooga program-integration of mathematics and science content; infusion of technology in representation, analysis, modeling, assessment and contextualization of content; immersion in intensive field-based experiences; and a focus on designing equitable learning environments-are synthesized as the students develop an intellectually challenging project-based instructional unit.

Apprentice TeachingThe purpose of Apprentice Teaching is to offer UTeaChattanooga students a culminating experience that provides them with the tools needed for their first teaching jobs. In Apprentice Teaching, students are immersed in the expectations, processes, and rewards of teaching. When making placements, UTeaChattanooga master teachers consider each apprentice teacher's characteristics and abilities as well as the cooperating teacher's teaching and mentoring styles. The hope is that the complementary strengths of the UTeaChattanooga apprentice teacher and cooperating teacher will generate a synergism that benefits both people professionally. Embedded within Apprentice Teaching is a seminar component which is taught by master teachers, who share their teaching experiences and facilitate discussions, helping apprentice teachers develop their own successful teaching identities. The Apprentice Teaching seminar embedded within the Apprentice Teaching course, provides a supportive environment where apprentice teachers share their experiences and work on solutions to difficulties they are experiencing. The seminar is a good forum for students to get the guidance they consistently want on classroom management. The seminar objectives and activities are aligned with Tennessee Teacher Licensure Standards. The apprentice teachers demonstrate that they meet the state standards by preparing and submitting a final portfolio. Apprentice teachers concentrate on teaching lessons each week in which they demonstrate competency of particular state standards. Apprentice Teaching is a six-credit-hour course.

 

 

 

 

Senior Sequence

Step 1Step 1 is a 1-credit course which allows students to explore teaching as a career and for which UTC offers a tuition rebate. Following an introduction to the theory and practice behind excellent inquiry-based science and mathematics instruction, students teach lessons in elementary classrooms to obtain firsthand experience in planning and implementation. Master teachers-Step 1 instructors chosen for their experience and success in secondary classrooms-provide students direct exposure to people who love teaching and view it as a rewarding career choice. Mentor teachers at the low-socioeconomic schools where students teach their prepared lessons demonstrate effective teaching techniques and classroom management skills, giving the future teachers a true taste of working in a supportive, diverse educational setting. / 2 Combo Course

Knowing & LearningKnowing and Learning in Mathematics and Science is the first in a sequence of three, 3-credit professional development courses in the UTeaChattanooga program. It is followed by Classroom Interactions and Project-Based Instruction. Knowing and Learning is more than simply a general survey of theories in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) fields, its goal being for students to construct a model of knowing and learning that will guide their future classroom practice. This course revolves around an exploration of Essential Questions specifically relevant to teaching mathematics and science. Students begin by considering what standards for knowing are to be used, how knowing and learning are structured, and how what is known changes and develops. Ultimately, students must think about the tensions between general, cross-disciplinary characterizations of knowing (e.g., intelligence) and the specifics of coming to understand powerful ideas in mathematics and science.

Classroom InteractionsClassroom Interactions is typically the fourth UTeaChattanooga course taken by students and the second in a series of three, 3-credit professional development courses. It follows Knowing and Learning and precedes Project-Based Instruction. Classroom Interactions builds on the Knowing and Learning course, moving from a focus on thinking and learning to a focus on teaching and learning. The course is centered on a close examination of the interplay between teachers, students, and content, and how these types of interactions enable students to develop deep conceptual understanding. Prospective teachers are also introduced to ways in which curriculum and technology are used in classroom settings to build interrelationships among teachers and students. They are taught how content and pedagogy combine to make effective teaching.

PerspectivesPerspectives in Mathematics and Science is a 3 credit upper-division course designed to meet the unique needs of future secondary science and mathematics teachers. It is one of the specially designed content courses in the UTeaChattanooga sequence (others include Mathematical Models, Functions, and Applications and Research Methods). The course has several interlocking purposes: it is intended to help future math and science teachers learn how to think about math and science "from the outside"-to ask questions about what scientists and mathematicians do and why, about where science and technology came from and how they got to be so important in the world today, and about what kinds of questions scientists and mathematicians have tried to answer and why; it is designed to strengthen students' skills in the liberal arts, including sophisticated research and information analysis, fluent writing, and substantive argument; it requires students to put to work the insights and skills they have learned in science and math pedagogy classes by designing secondary school lesson plans that are built around events and concepts from the history of science and mathematics.

 

Research MethodsResearch Methods is a three-hour course in the required UTeaChattanooga sequence. It is one of several content courses specially designed to meet the needs of future secondary mathematics and science teachers (others include Perspectives in Mathematics and Science and Mathematical Models, Functions, and Applications). The goals of the course are: to provide UTeaChattanooga students with the tools that scientists use to solve scientific problems; to give students the opportunity to use these tools in a laboratory setting; to make students aware of how scientists communicate with each other through peer-reviewed scientific literature; to enable students to understand how scientists develop new knowledge and insights, the most important of which are eventually presented in textbooks and taught in conventional science classes.

Project Based InstructionProject-Based Instruction (PBI) is the capstone course in the sequence of professional development courses (Knowing and Learning, Classroom Interactions, and PBI) UTeaChattanooga students take prior to Apprentice Teaching and is 3 credits. PBI is the course in which a number of the major principles and themes of the UTeaChattanooga program-integration of mathematics and science content; infusion of technology in representation, analysis, modeling, assessment and contextualization of content; immersion in intensive field-based experiences; and a focus on designing equitable learning environments-are synthesized as the students develop an intellectually challenging project-based instructional unit.

Apprentice TeachingThe purpose of Apprentice Teaching is to offer UTeaChattanooga students a culminating experience that provides them with the tools needed for their first teaching jobs. In Apprentice Teaching, students are immersed in the expectations, processes, and rewards of teaching. When making placements, UTeaChattanooga master teachers consider each apprentice teacher's characteristics and abilities as well as the cooperating teacher's teaching and mentoring styles. The hope is that the complementary strengths of the UTeaChattanooga apprentice teacher and cooperating teacher will generate a synergism that benefits both people professionally. Embedded within Apprentice Teaching is a seminar component which is taught by master teachers, who share their teaching experiences and facilitate discussions, helping apprentice teachers develop their own successful teaching identities. The Apprentice Teaching seminar embedded within the Apprentice Teaching course, provides a supportive environment where apprentice teachers share their experiences and work on solutions to difficulties they are experiencing. The seminar is a good forum for students to get the guidance they consistently want on classroom management. The seminar objectives and activities are aligned with Tennessee Teacher Licensure Standards. The apprentice teachers demonstrate that they meet the state standards by preparing and submitting a final portfolio. Apprentice teachers concentrate on teaching lessons each week in which they demonstrate competency of particular state standards. Apprentice Teaching is a six-credit-hour course.

*Courses in Blue have a field component. Two Field courses cannot be taken at the same time

*Mathematics majors are also required to take Functions and Modeling MATH 2300

 

Course Title

Field Experience Setting

Step 1

Elementary School

Step 2

Middle School

Classroom Interactions

High School

Project-Based Instruction

High School

Apprentice Teaching

High School