Online Degree Completion Criminal Justice, B.S

female student on computerUTC’s distance education programs provide high quality courses and services in a flexible learning environment that fits the schedule of busy professionals or non-traditional students. We recognize that many quality students wish to earn a B.S. degree, but may not be able to attend traditional face to face classes on campus.

Courses in the online program have been modified specifically for web-based delivery. All course requirements are identical to the face–to-face program offered on-site at UTC. The material is simply delivered in a different format. Courses are taught by full-time faculty members who teach the same courses face to face at UTC. Students experience on-line courses with the same quality and rigor expected in a face–to-face course. Online students receive the same degree/diploma as face to face students. In other words, everything but the delivery style is the same.

This program is specifically designed for individuals who have completed a two-year degree (or equivalent) and would like to pursue a Bachelors Degree in Criminal Justice. This type of program is referred to as a Degree Completion Program. The program is designed for individuals who have some college experience and/or a two year degree from a community college. UTC currently does not offer enough online courses to complete general education requirements or the entire 120 hours for the degree online.

In order to begin the program students must have:

  • An A.S. or A.A. degree from an accredited college (An A.A.S. degree will likely require additional coursework before being admitted to the online program).

OR

  • 60 hours of college credit from an accredited college including all general education equivalents as required by UTC.

We will work with students to evaluate course equivalencies and make recommendations about any additional courses needed in order to begin the program.

There are additional UTC graduation requirements that students must meet. In order to graduate from UTC, students must have 60 hours of credit from an accredited 4 year college. Students must also complete their last 24 hours of credit at UTC.

Yes -- UTC is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS). It is part of the University of Tennessee system. Your degree will "look" like any other degree awarded by UTC to any of our 12,000 students on our campus attending face to face classes.

Yes -- Your degree will "look" like any other degree awarded by UTC to any of our 12,000 students on our campus attending face to face classes. Your employer would have no reason to even know that you have taken online classes. It is not reflected on your transcript. All course requirements are identical to the face–to-face program offered on-site at UTC. The material is simply delivered in a different format.

Courses are offered in regularly scheduled intervals. This requires careful planning to ensure that courses are taken in the proper sequence to ensure pre-requisites and graduation requirements are satisfied. This includes taking classes in the summer, which is mandatory due to the course rotations.

Students will receive a schedule from the CRMJ Distance Learning Program advisor each semester based upon course availability and degree requirements. This is done to ensure that students take the courses in a manner that will most efficiently get them to graduation.

If you have an Associate of Science (AS) or Associate of Arts (AA) degree from a public school in Tennessee, all of your general education requirements are met when you transfer to UTC. If you do not have one of these degrees, we can help you evaluate how your courses will transfer in to meet general education requirements.

All information about tuition and fees can be obtained from the Bursar’s Office.

Our UTC Online Office provides support for students to assist with the application process and getting registered. They also provide other support services for online students.

On-line courses are asynchronous meaning that students complete their work at different times throughout the day and week. For the most part, all students are not on-line at the same time. On-line courses are NOT independent study courses. They are NOT self-paced. They require a daily and/or weekly time commitment which includes on-line interaction with faculty and other students in the class. Students need access to a computer and the Internet, and they also need to have basic computer skills.

 

Online courses require at least as much, if not more, time and commitment than traditional face to face courses. Students who enjoy
working independently and who have good time management skills often excel in on-line courses, but this delivery method is not for everyone.

 

There are several assessment instruments that will allow you to reflect upon your ability to excel in an on-line format.

UTC has established minimum technological needs and recommended computer skills. If you are having problems, please check on the link to enable some settings on your browser.

 

You also should be able to perform the computer skills listed below (at a minimum):

  • General Skills
    • Locate and open files
    • Save a file to a specific location
    • Save a document as a doc, rtf, or txt
    • Print a document
    • Create a new document
    • Format text in document (font, size, etc)
    • Cut, copy and paste text within a document
    • Cut, copy and paste text between 2 separate
    • documents
    • Open and play a presentation (such as
    • Microsoft PowerPoint)
    • Open and play a video clip with audio
    • Download and install plug-ins and software
  • Internet/Browser Skills
    • Identify the browser you are using
    • Use the address bar to go to a web site
    • Navigate a web site
    • Recognize links on a web page
    • Check and send email
    • Check and send email with attachments
    • Download and save a document from the web
  • Skills for Online Research
    • Search online databases
    • Use search strategies
    • Evaluate the accuracy and credibility of
    • information