Resources

 

UTC Resources

On-campus services to help while you're at UTC.

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The UTC Library services all UTC students, faculty, staff, and alumni, as well as the local community. The UTC Library is well equipped to support the research and scholarship needs of the UTC community with an operating budget of over 4.1 million dollars, a dynamic and engaged faculty and staff, a new library building that opened in January 2015, and a broad collection of diverse materials including 600,000 print and ebooks, over 30,000 digital journals available, 150+ indexes and databases, and more.

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Everyone can benefit from getting feedback on their writing. The WCC helps students, faculty, and staff with any type of writing or communication project—including research papers, presentations, and resumes—at any stage in the process. The WCC offers individualized consultations (in person and online), workshops and class presentations, a library of writers’ resources, and a supportive environment.

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Office for Undergraduate Research and Creative Endeavor

At UTC, the undergraduate student experience centers on inquiry, discovery, and community. Through undergraduate research experiences our students acquire the twenty-first century skills necessary to successfully navigate the global world of work or advanced study and make significant contributions to society. URaCE programs and initiatives aim to foster a robust research culture that involves the entire UTC community, while also contributing to the local environs of Chattanooga and creating dialogues with the wider global community.

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The mission of the Grayson H. Walker Center for Teaching and Learning at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga (UTC) is to support UTC's strategic plan and academic initiatives to facilitate excellence in university instruction by providing assistance, information, learning sessions, and consultations in the areas of teaching, learning and technology integration.

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Did you know that UTC offers students lots of free software? Check out what's available.

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General History Resources

The American Historical Association is the largest professional organization serving historians in all fields and all professions. The AHA is a trusted voice advocating for history education, the professional work of historians, and the critical role of historical thinking in public life.

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The latest activity of the AHA and historians in supporting history and historical thinking.

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Digital technologies have expanded the reach of scholarship in the way scholars communicate their research to an audience and present findings, as well as influencing the questions they ask in planning a research project. Text analysis, data and text mining, mapping, data visualization, and a variety of other digital methods and tools make forms of research beyond the traditional text-based article or monograph possible, while also encouraging scholars to consider questions of data storage, visual presentation, and user engagement. Here, you can find resources on getting started in digital history, articles on doing digital history, and projects of interest. 

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The best history websites.

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Online Sources and Documents

Internet Archive is a non-profit library of millions of free books, movies, software, music, websites, and more. 

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In the spring of 2016, the American Historical Association and the American Historical Review began compiling a list of digitized primary sources to be posted publicly. The AHR began publishing a curated listing of digitized primary source collections in the May 2016 issue.

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Resources in American History ranging from general sites to specific event information.

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The Library of Congress is the largest library in the world, with millions of books, recordings, photographs, newspapers, maps and manuscripts in its collections. The Library is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office.

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The World Factbook provides information on the history, people and society, government, economy, energy, geography, communications, transportation, military, and transnational issues for 267 world entities. The Reference tab includes: a variety of world, regional, country, ocean, and time zone maps; Flags of the World; and a Country Comparison function that ranks the country information and data in more than 75 Factbook fields. 

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The Fordham University Internet History Sourcebooks Project is a collection of public domain and copy-permitted historical texts presented cleanly (without advertising or excessive layout) for educational use. Primary sources are available here primarily for use in high-school and university/college courses. From the outset the site took a very broad view of the sources that should be available to students and as well as documents long associated with a "western civilization" approach to history also provides much information on Byzantine, Islamic, Jewish, Indian, East Asian, and African history. You will also find many documents especially relevant to women's history and LGBT studies.

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The largest online collection of animated historical maps. For students: a learning tool to increase comprehension and retention. For teachers: a ready-made teaching tool to add visual impact in the classroom. For history buffs: novel technology to provide new perspectives.

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The Early Americas Digital Archive (EADA) is a collection of electronic texts originally written in or about the Americas from 1492 to approximately 1820. Open to the public for research and teaching purposes, EADA is published and supported by the University of Maryland Libraries’ e-Publishing Initiative, and was originally developed with the support of the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH). Intended as a long-term and inter-disciplinary project committed to exploring the intersections between traditional humanities research and digital technologies, it invites scholars from all disciplines to submit their editions of early American texts for publication on this site. To learn more about EADA, please see Introduction to the Archive. In order to search the database of documents housed at EADA, see Browse/Search the Archive. In order to find early American texts on the Internet, at the EADA and elsewhere, see Gateway of Early American authors on the Internet.

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Documenting the American South (DocSouth) is a digital publishing initiative that provides Internet access to texts, images, and audio files related to southern history, literature, and culture. Currently DocSouth includes sixteen thematic collections of books, diaries, posters, artifacts, letters, oral history interviews, and songs. The University Library of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill sponsors Documenting the American South, and the texts and materials come primarily from its southern holdings. The UNC University Library is committed to the long-term availability of these collections and their online records. An editorial board guides development of this digital library.

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The images in Slavery Images: A Visual Record of the African Slave Trade and Slave Life in the Early African Diaspora have been selected from a wide range of sources, most of them dating from the period of slavery. Our growing collection currently has over 1,200 images. This website is envisioned as a tool and a resource that can be used by teachers, researchers, students, and the general public - in brief, anyone interested in the experiences of Africans who were enslaved and transported to the Americas and the lives of their descendants in the slave societies of the New World. 

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This digital memorial raises questions about the largest slave trades in history and offers access to the documentation available to answer them. European colonizers turned to Africa for enslaved laborers to build the cities and extract the resources of the Americas. They forced millions of mostly unnamed Africans across the Atlantic to the Americas, and from one part of the Americas to another. Analyze these slave trades and view interactive maps, timelines, and animations to see the dispersal in action.

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A portal to world history websites developed by the Center for History and New Media at George Mason University.

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The Met’s Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History pairs essays and works of art with chronologies, telling the story of art and global culture through the Museum’s collection.

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This overview of world history since AD 1500, with its underlying theme of shifting global power, tells in short compass how the modern world has come to be what it is.

Online PDF textbook available to UTC students with login.

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World history poses extraordinary demands upon those who teach it, challenging the talent of experienced instructors as well as to those new to the field. World History Connected is designed for everyone who wants to deepen the engagement and understanding of world history: students, college instructors, high school teachers, leaders of teacher education programs, social studies coordinators, research historians, and librarians. For all these readers, WHC presents innovative classroom-ready scholarship, keeps readers up to date on the latest research and debates, presents the best in learning and teaching methods and practices, offers readers rich teaching resources, and reports on exemplary teaching. WHC is free worldwide. It is published by the University of Illinois Press, and its institutional home is Hawaii Pacific University, Honolulu, Hawaii.

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Information portal on the history of the Ottoman Empire.

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Resources for Research and Writing

Set of guides written and made available by Patrick Rael, Professor of History at Bowdoin College (Maine).

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From the Department of History at Indiana University.

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From the American Historical Association.

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The Online Writing Lab (OWL) at Purdue University houses writing resources and instructional material, and we provide these as a free service of the Writing Lab at Purdue. Students, members of the community, and users worldwide will find information to assist with many writing projects. Teachers and trainers may use this material for in-class and out-of-class instruction.

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From the Purdue Online Writing Lab.

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From the Harvard College Writing Center.

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From Grand Valley State University.

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From the University of Montana.

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Plagiarism -- What It Is and How To Avoid It

This plagiarism guide is designed to help you understand what plagiarism is, what the penalties for plagiarism are, and how you can avoid it.

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From Health Informatics

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History Beyond the Classroom

History Matters is an undergraduate history journal that is published annually on this website by the Department of History at Appalachian State University. The journal is edited by undergraduates with the help of a faculty board.

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H-Net is an international interdisciplinary organization of scholars and teachers dedicated to developing the enormous educational potential of the Internet and the World Wide Web. Our edited networks publish peer reviewed essays, multimedia materials, and discussions for colleagues and the interested public. The computing heart and main office of H-Net resides at the History DepartmentMichigan State University, but H-Net officers, editors and subscribers come from all over the globe.

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Are you a junior or senior in need of upper-level elective credits in History? Are you seeking opportunities to further develop and practice your historical, critical thinking, and problem solving skills beyond the traditional classroom setting? Looking to engage in experiential learning and earn ThinkAchieve: Beyond the Classroom credit? If so, consider “HIST 4920: Internships in History.”

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Career Resources

No matter your major or year, we have the tools to jump-start your future. We're here to help you find the career path that is right for you and prepare you along the way. From career fairs, job postings, resume critiques and mock interviews, we want to see you achieve. Local employers, collaborate with us to find your next stand-out employee.

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A career guide from the American Historical Association, the major professional organization for historians.

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Another helpful guide from the American Historical Association.

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A blog of the American Historical Association.

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If you major in history do you have to become a historian?  No.  This site from the American Historical Association will help you understand and articulate the usefulness of historical training to a variety of career paths.

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Good advice from a broad-based site for job seekers.

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Provides career-planning resources for liberal arts students.

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A site run by the HR Policy Association trade group. Job seekers ask questions which are answered by representatives of major employers. They keep an archive of answered questions that is available to browse.

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Includes a Career Finder tool that helps history majors find career inspiration and opportunities. Also notes that graduates with history degrees can pursue a variety of well-compensated, fast growing careers.

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Graduate School Resources

This page provides links to the most popular resources the Association has prepared or found for graduate students at every stage in their studies and for early career professionals.

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