Current Courses

 

A complete list of history courses with descriptions can be found here.

The full class schedule can be found here.

Courses with an *asterisk* also satisfy General Education requirements.

More information on the four-level curriculum structure can be found here.

 


Summer 2017

This course will introduce students to human achievements in Eurasia, Africa, and the Americas from the origins of civilization to about the year 1400. Rather than taking a strictly chronological approach to civilizations and cultures, it will emphasize emerging cultures, traditions, and religions both as expressions of their time and place and as meaningful in our modern world.

Satisfies the following General Education Requirements:  Historical Understanding; Non-Western Cultures; Thoughts, Values, & Beliefs 

31805 / James Guilfoyle / Internet

31806James Guilfoyle / Internet

This course will focus on the evolution of multiple, autonomous cultural centers within Africa, Eurasia, and the Americas prior to 1400 to an interconnected global system in the present. Topics covered include exploration, colonialism, responses to industrialization, the spread of the nation-state, the rise of modern science, the impact of a global economy, ethnicity and nationalism, migration, and mass culture.

Satisfies the following General Education Requirements:  Historical Understanding; Non-Western Cultures

31807Boris Gorshkov / Internet

31802 / Amy Huesman / MW 11:20-2:30

A study of the political, economic, social, and cultural development of the state from the days of the Indians to the present.

Satisfies the following General Education Requirement:  Historical Understanding

31803 / David Lee / TR 11:20-2:30

The history of Britain from the earliest times to the present; the first semester emphasizing constitutional and institutional developments to 1660; the second semester, the growth of political democracy, the British Empire, economic and social change.

31804 / Michelle White / MTWRF 9:25-10:40

 

Fall 2017

Courses by Level

Courses by Subject/Region

General Education Courses

 

Courses by Level

Introductory Courses

This course will introduce students to human achievements in Eurasia, Africa, and the Americas from the origins of civilization to about the year 1400. Rather than taking a strictly chronological approach to civilizations and cultures, it will emphasize emerging cultures, traditions, and religions both as expressions of their time and place and as meaningful in our modern world.

Satisfies the following General Education requirements:  Historical Understanding; Non-Western; and Thoughts, Values, and Beliefs

48188 / Ruby Choudhury / MWF 8:00-8:50

48189 / Kira Robison / MWF 10:00-10:50

48190 / Michelle White / TR 10:50-12:05

48191 / Ruby Choudhury / Internet

48192 / Ruby Choudhury / Internet

48194 / James Guilfoyle / Internet

48195 / James Guilfoyle / TR 1:40-2:55

48861 / Kira Robison / M 5:00-6:15 + Internet (Hybrid)

This course will focus on the evolution of multiple, autonomous cultural centers within Africa, Eurasia, and the Americas prior to 1400 to an interconnected global system in the present. Topics covered include exploration, colonialism, responses to industrialization, the spread of the nation-state, the rise of modern science, the impact of a global economy, ethnicity and nationalism, migration, and mass culture.

Satisfies the following General Education Requirements:  Historical Understanding; Non-Western Cultures

48196Fang Yu Hu / TR 8:00-9:15 

49261Fang Yu Hu / MW 3:25-4:40 

49425 / Julia Cummiskey / MWF 10:00-10:50

49329 / Ryan Edwards / TR 12:15-1:30

49330Ryan Edwards / TR 10:50-12:05

48202 / Annie Tracy Samuel / MWF 10:00-10:50

48203Annie Tracy Samuel / MWF 11:00-11:50

48208Boris Gorshkov / TR 10:50-12:05 

48207 / Amy Huesman / TR 9:25-10:40

48198Boris Gorshkov / Internet

48199Boris Gorshkov / Internet

48209Boris Gorshkov / Internet

48600 / Amy Huesman / W 5:30-8:00 + Internet (Hybrid)

A survey of American History from the age of discovery to the present, with special attention to the peoples, ideas, and cultures that created the United States.

Satisfies the following General Education Requirement:  Historical Understanding

48210Michael Thompson / TR 10:50-12:05

48846 / TBA / MWF 12:00-12:50

48847TBA / MWF 1:00-1:50

A survey of American History from the age of discovery to the present, with special attention to the peoples, ideas, and cultures that created the United States.

Satisfies the following General Education Requirement:  Historical Understanding

48213Stephen Taylor / MWF 8:00-8:50

48211 / Susan Eckelmann Berghel / TR 9:25-10:40

48212Susan Eckelmann Berghel / TR 10:50-12:05

48214 / Scott Seagle / Internet

48215 / Dana Brown / Internet

 

2000-Level Courses

A study of the political, economic, social, and cultural development of the state from the days of the Indians to the present.

Satisfies the following General Education Requirement:  Historical Understanding

48312 / David Lee / R 5:30-8:00

Introduction to principles and practices of historical research and writing. Emphasizes research methods and techniques, analysis of source material, construction of historical arguments, and effective written presentation of material in multiple contexts.

Satisfies the following General Education Requirement:  Rhetoric & Writing/Composition II

48310 / James GuilfoyleTR 9:25-10:40

48311 / James GuilfoyleTR 10:50-12:05

48622 / TBA / MWF 9:00-9:50

48848 / TBA / MWF 10:00-10:50

An exploration of American political, social, economic, and cultural life in the United States from the 1870s to the 1920s; topics include urban inequality, industrialization, mass immigration, Progressive reform, Jim Crow laws, and 1920s popular culture.

Satisfies the following General Education Requirement:  Historical Understanding

48097 / William Kuby / TR 10:50-12:05

48098 / William Kuby / TR 12:15-1:30

This course examines the emergence of modern nations from the rich and diverse cultures of East Asia and their transformations since 1600, with particular focus on China, Japan, and Korea. The course analyzes linkages within Asia and with other regions. This course focuses on how modernity, imperialism, and nationalism shaped each area and the region.

Satisfies the following General Education Requirements:  Historical Understanding; Non-Western Cultures

49321 / Norton Wheeler / MWF 12:00-12:50

48852 / Norton Wheeler / MWF 2:00-2:50

 

3000-Level Courses

A broad survey of the political, cultural, and social history of Ancient Greece. Topics may include Bronze Age culture, the Persian Wars, Classical Athens and Sparta, the rise of Macedonia, as well as the art, philosophy, and religion of Greece’s polis-based society.

48853Kira Robison / MW 2:00-3:15

A study of the religious, political, social, and economic factors involved in the Protestant and Catholic Reformations as well as their impact on European culture and continued religious reform through the end of the seventeenth century.

48854Boris Gorshkov / TR 9:25-10:40

A comparative historical study of the southern African region. Topics will include the societies and cultures of foraging, herding and agricultural peoples; pre-colonial states, empires, and trade; early European settlement and evolution of Euro-African communities; slavery and settler colonies; colonial rule and African responses; resistance, independence, and apartheid; independent states and societies; modern regional trends and developments.

48856 / Julia Cummiskey / MWF 12:00-12:50

27742 / Edward Richey / W 5:00-7:30

 

4000-Level Courses

A seminar primarily intended for advanced majors in history or a related field. Focusing on specific topics in American, European, or World history, the course will help students master topics such as historiographical debate, analysis of historical evidence, and current historical methodologies.

48107 / Annie Tracy Samuel / M 2:00-4:30

 

Courses by Subject/Region

U.S. History Courses

A survey of American History from the age of discovery to the present, with special attention to the peoples, ideas, and cultures that created the United States.

Satisfies the following General Education Requirement:  Historical Understanding

48210Michael Thompson / TR 10:50-12:05

48846 / TBA / MWF 12:00-12:50

48847TBA / MWF 1:00-1:50

A survey of American History from the age of discovery to the present, with special attention to the peoples, ideas, and cultures that created the United States.

Satisfies the following General Education Requirement:  Historical Understanding

48213Stephen Taylor / MWF 8:00-8:50

48211 / Susan Eckelmann Berghel / TR 9:25-10:40

48212Susan Eckelmann Berghel / TR 10:50-12:05

48214 / Scott Seagle / Internet

48215 / Dana Brown / Internet

A study of the political, economic, social, and cultural development of the state from the days of the Indians to the present.

Satisfies the following General Education Requirement:  Historical Understanding

48312 / David Lee / R 5:30-8:00

An exploration of American political, social, economic, and cultural life in the United States from the 1870s to the 1920s; topics include urban inequality, industrialization, mass immigration, Progressive reform, Jim Crow laws, and 1920s popular culture.

Satisfies the following General Education Requirement:  Historical Understanding

48097 / William Kuby / TR 10:50-12:05

48098 / William Kuby / TR 12:15-1:30

 

European History Courses

A broad survey of the political, cultural, and social history of Ancient Greece. Topics may include Bronze Age culture, the Persian Wars, Classical Athens and Sparta, the rise of Macedonia, as well as the art, philosophy, and religion of Greece’s polis-based society.

48853Kira Robison / MW 2:00-3:15

A study of the religious, political, social, and economic factors involved in the Protestant and Catholic Reformations as well as their impact on European culture and continued religious reform through the end of the seventeenth century.

48854Boris Gorshkov / TR 9:25-10:40

 

World History Courses

This course will introduce students to human achievements in Eurasia, Africa, and the Americas from the origins of civilization to about the year 1400. Rather than taking a strictly chronological approach to civilizations and cultures, it will emphasize emerging cultures, traditions, and religions both as expressions of their time and place and as meaningful in our modern world.

Satisfies the following General Education requirements:  Historical Understanding; Non-Western; and Thoughts, Values, and Beliefs

48188 / Ruby Choudhury / MWF 8:00-8:50

48189 / Kira Robison / MWF 10:00-10:50

48190 / Michelle White / TR 10:50-12:05

48191 / Ruby Choudhury / Internet

48192 / Ruby Choudhury / Internet

48194 / James Guilfoyle / Internet

48195 / James Guilfoyle / TR 1:40-2:55

48861 / Kira Robison / M 5:00-6:15 + Internet (Hybrid)

This course will focus on the evolution of multiple, autonomous cultural centers within Africa, Eurasia, and the Americas prior to 1400 to an interconnected global system in the present. Topics covered include exploration, colonialism, responses to industrialization, the spread of the nation-state, the rise of modern science, the impact of a global economy, ethnicity and nationalism, migration, and mass culture.

Satisfies the following General Education Requirements:  Historical Understanding; Non-Western Cultures

48196Fang Yu Hu / TR 8:00-9:15 

49261Fang Yu Hu / MW 3:25-4:40 

49425 / Julia Cummiskey / MWF 10:00-10:50

49329 / Ryan Edwards / TR 12:15-1:30

49330Ryan Edwards / TR 10:50-12:05

48202 / Annie Tracy Samuel / MWF 10:00-10:50

48203Annie Tracy Samuel / MWF 11:00-11:50

48208Boris Gorshkov / TR 10:50-12:05 

48207 / Amy Huesman / TR 9:25-10:40

48198Boris Gorshkov / Internet

48199Boris Gorshkov / Internet

48209Boris Gorshkov / Internet

48600 / Amy Huesman / W 5:30-8:00 + Internet (Hybrid)

This course examines the emergence of modern nations from the rich and diverse cultures of East Asia and their transformations since 1600, with particular focus on China, Japan, and Korea. The course analyzes linkages within Asia and with other regions. This course focuses on how modernity, imperialism, and nationalism shaped each area and the region.

Satisfies the following General Education Requirements:  Historical Understanding; Non-Western Cultures

49321 / Norton Wheeler / MWF 12:00-12:50

48852 / Norton Wheeler / MWF 2:00-2:50

A comparative historical study of the southern African region. Topics will include the societies and cultures of foraging, herding and agricultural peoples; pre-colonial states, empires, and trade; early European settlement and evolution of Euro-African communities; slavery and settler colonies; colonial rule and African responses; resistance, independence, and apartheid; independent states and societies; modern regional trends and developments.

48856 / Julia Cummiskey / MWF 12:00-12:50

 

Core & Departmental Courses

Introduction to principles and practices of historical research and writing. Emphasizes research methods and techniques, analysis of source material, construction of historical arguments, and effective written presentation of material in multiple contexts.

Satisfies the following General Education Requirement:  Rhetoric & Writing/Composition II

48310 / James GuilfoyleTR 9:25-10:40

48311 / James GuilfoyleTR 10:50-12:05

48622 / TBA / MWF 9:00-9:50

48848 / TBA / MWF 10:00-10:50

A seminar primarily intended for advanced majors in history or a related field. Focusing on specific topics in American, European, or World history, the course will help students master topics such as historiographical debate, analysis of historical evidence, and current historical methodologies.

48107 / Annie Tracy Samuel / M 2:00-4:30

 

General Education Courses

This course will introduce students to human achievements in Eurasia, Africa, and the Americas from the origins of civilization to about the year 1400. Rather than taking a strictly chronological approach to civilizations and cultures, it will emphasize emerging cultures, traditions, and religions both as expressions of their time and place and as meaningful in our modern world.

Satisfies the following General Education requirements:  Historical Understanding; Non-Western; and Thoughts, Values, and Beliefs

48188 / Ruby Choudhury / MWF 8:00-8:50

48189 / Kira Robison / MWF 10:00-10:50

48190 / Michelle White / TR 10:50-12:05

48191 / Ruby Choudhury / Internet

48192 / Ruby Choudhury / Internet

48194 / James Guilfoyle / Internet

48195 / James Guilfoyle / TR 1:40-2:55

48861 / Kira Robison / M 5:00-6:15 + Internet (Hybrid)

This course will focus on the evolution of multiple, autonomous cultural centers within Africa, Eurasia, and the Americas prior to 1400 to an interconnected global system in the present. Topics covered include exploration, colonialism, responses to industrialization, the spread of the nation-state, the rise of modern science, the impact of a global economy, ethnicity and nationalism, migration, and mass culture.

Satisfies the following General Education Requirements:  Historical Understanding; Non-Western Cultures

48196Fang Yu Hu / TR 8:00-9:15 

49261Fang Yu Hu / MW 3:25-4:40 

49425 / Julia Cummiskey / MWF 10:00-10:50

49329 / Ryan Edwards / TR 12:15-1:30

49330Ryan Edwards / TR 10:50-12:05

48202 / Annie Tracy Samuel / MWF 10:00-10:50

48203Annie Tracy Samuel / MWF 11:00-11:50

48208Boris Gorshkov / TR 10:50-12:05 

48207 / Amy Huesman / TR 9:25-10:40

48198Boris Gorshkov / Internet

48199Boris Gorshkov / Internet

48209Boris Gorshkov / Internet

48600 / Amy Huesman / W 5:30-8:00 + Internet (Hybrid)

A survey of American History from the age of discovery to the present, with special attention to the peoples, ideas, and cultures that created the United States.

Satisfies the following General Education Requirement:  Historical Understanding

48210Michael Thompson / TR 10:50-12:05

48846 / TBA / MWF 12:00-12:50

48847TBA / MWF 1:00-1:50

A survey of American History from the age of discovery to the present, with special attention to the peoples, ideas, and cultures that created the United States.

Satisfies the following General Education Requirement:  Historical Understanding

48213Stephen Taylor / MWF 8:00-8:50

48211 / Susan Eckelmann Berghel / TR 9:25-10:40

48212Susan Eckelmann Berghel / TR 10:50-12:05

48214 / Scott Seagle / Internet

48215 / Dana Brown / Internet

A study of the political, economic, social, and cultural development of the state from the days of the Indians to the present.

Satisfies the following General Education Requirement:  Historical Understanding

48312 / David Lee / R 5:30-8:00

Introduction to principles and practices of historical research and writing. Emphasizes research methods and techniques, analysis of source material, construction of historical arguments, and effective written presentation of material in multiple contexts.

Satisfies the following General Education Requirement:  Rhetoric & Writing/Composition II

48310 / James GuilfoyleTR 9:25-10:40

48311 / James GuilfoyleTR 10:50-12:05

48622 / TBA / MWF 9:00-9:50

48848 / TBA / MWF 10:00-10:50

An exploration of American political, social, economic, and cultural life in the United States from the 1870s to the 1920s; topics include urban inequality, industrialization, mass immigration, Progressive reform, Jim Crow laws, and 1920s popular culture.

Satisfies the following General Education Requirement:  Historical Understanding

48097 / William Kuby / TR 10:50-12:05

48098 / William Kuby / TR 12:15-1:30

This course examines the emergence of modern nations from the rich and diverse cultures of East Asia and their transformations since 1600, with particular focus on China, Japan, and Korea. The course analyzes linkages within Asia and with other regions. This course focuses on how modernity, imperialism, and nationalism shaped each area and the region.

Satisfies the following General Education Requirements:  Historical Understanding; Non-Western Cultures

49321 / Norton Wheeler / MWF 12:00-12:50

48852 / Norton Wheeler / MWF 2:00-2:50