Current Courses

 

A complete list of history courses with descriptions can be found here.

The full class schedule can be found here.

Courses with an *asterisk* also satisfy General Education requirements.

More information on the four-level curriculum structure can be found here.

 


Spring 2018

Courses by Level

Courses by Subject/Region

General Education Courses

 

Courses by Level

Introductory Courses

This course will introduce students to human achievements in Eurasia, Africa, and the Americas from the origins of civilization to about the year 1400. Rather than taking a strictly chronological approach to civilizations and cultures, it will emphasize emerging cultures, traditions, and religions both as expressions of their time and place and as meaningful in our modern world.

Satisfies the following General Education requirements:  Historical Understanding; Non-Western; and Thoughts, Values, and Beliefs

This course will focus on the evolution of multiple, autonomous cultural centers within Africa, Eurasia, and the Americas prior to 1400 to an interconnected global system in the present. Topics covered include exploration, colonialism, responses to industrialization, the spread of the nation-state, the rise of modern science, the impact of a global economy, ethnicity and nationalism, migration, and mass culture.

Satisfies the following General Education Requirements:  Historical Understanding; Non-Western Cultures

A survey of American History from the age of discovery to the present, with special attention to the peoples, ideas, and cultures that created the United States.

Satisfies the following General Education Requirement:  Historical Understanding

A survey of American History from the age of discovery to the present, with special attention to the peoples, ideas, and cultures that created the United States.

Satisfies the following General Education Requirement:  Historical Understanding

 

2000-Level Courses

Introduction to principles and practices of historical research and writing. Emphasizes research methods and techniques, analysis of source material, construction of historical arguments, and effective written presentation of material in multiple contexts.

Satisfies the following General Education Requirement:  Rhetoric & Writing/Composition II

This course surveys important themes and developments of European history from the beginning of the French Revolution to approximately the turn of the twenty-first century. Topics covered may include the balance of power in Europe and international relations; the rise of imperialism; the spread of industrial society; the problems of world wars and reconstruction; the decline of European colonial systems, and the diplomacy of the Cold War.

Satisfies the following General Education Requirement:  Historical Understanding

Instructor:  Boris Gorshkov

An examination of political, economic, and social aspects of the recent past, including post-World War II readjustments, the Cold War, the Kennedy years, the Vietnam trauma, and the downfall of the “imperial presidency.” 

Satisfies the following General Education Requirement:  Historical Understanding

Instructor:  William Kuby

 

3000-Level Courses

The history of Britain from the earliest times to the present; the first semester emphasizing constitutional and institutional developments to 1660; the second semester, the growth of political democracy, the British Empire, economic and social change.

Instructor:  James Guilfoyle

This class will explore United States history from roughly 1790 to 1850, the period between the achievement of a stable, independent nation and the unraveling of that nation over the issue of slavery. Students will read about, discuss, and write about the major themes of these decades: emergence of political parties, international conflict, rise of a market economy, expansion (and contraction) of democracy, geographic expansion, and contentious issues of class, race, gender, and social reform. 

Instructor:  Norton Wheeler

Who gets to have a childhood in American history?  Are all childhoods equal?  How does exclusion, discrimination, and oppression shape the lives of nonwhite youth?  Addressing these questions chronologically, this course surveys American children’s experiences and conditions from the first colonies to recent times.  Through primarily the eyes of children and youth, each assigned reading and class discussion will illustrate the changing circumstances of children’s lives and societal attitudes toward youth.  The course’s analytical arch centers on young people’s perspectives and recorded accounts including diaries, memoirs, and oral histories.  Students will also examine children’s material culture (toys, dress codes, and furniture); institutions and spaces (schools, recreational sites, the work place, and the streets); and media (children’s books, advertisements, comics, historical photographs, archived correspondence, and documentaries).  Balancing chronological breadth and a broad range of course topics, students will investigate and compare the lives of American youth during slavery, the Civil War, the interwar and Great Depression era, 1960s freedom struggles, and postwar urban American life.

Instructor:  Susan Eckelmann Berghel

This course explores the history of the southern Appalachian region from the pre-Columbian era through the 21st century.  It focuses on the extent to which perceptions of Appalachia have reflected historical realities and how the relationship between the region, the United States, and the world has changed over time.

Instructor:  Luke Manget

This course will examine female spirituality and devotional practices in medieval Europe from 1200-1550, and the social and political circumstances that caused some women to be identified as holy, while others were persecuted as heretics.

Cross-listed with Women's Studies.

Instructor:  Amy Huesman

Since the early twentieth century most countries in Europe define themselves as nation-states, but most of them are not ethnically homogeneous. Two of the largest minorities in Eastern Europe before 1945 were Jews and Germans. Today one of the largest groups is the Roma. In this course you will learn how Central and Eastern Europe became a series of nation-states with numerous national, ethnic, and religious minorities. During Spring Break we will travel to Slovakia to meet representatives of the Hungarian minority in Slovakia, and we will visit communities in Hungary that were once German and some that are mainly inhabited by Roma. We will also meet with members of the Jewish community in Hungary and learn about how they are today one of the largest Jewish communities in Europe after the Holocaust. Students taking this course will also be required to travel with the class to Slovakia and Hungary during Spring Break 2018. 

Instructor:  John Swanson

This course is an introduction to the history of Latin America in and part of the modern world from the Bourbon reforms (1760s) and independence movements (1810s) to the present (2010s). The course covers political and economic regimes and transformations, as well as social and cultural movements, and environmental concerns, and will travel from the deserts of the US-Mexico border to the Amazon rain-forest and the glacial archipelago of Patagonia.

Instructor:  Ryan Edwards

This course will allow students to explore African history methods and literature by looking at the history of disease, health, and healing in Africa from pre-colonial times to the present. We will look at the changing ways African people and states have conceived of and responded to relationships between human and natural environment, between individual and collective wellbeing, and between bodily and social health. We will critically analyze how scholars’ choices of sources and scope reflect, challenge, or obscure these understandings.

Instructor:  Julia Cummiskey

This course examines the exchange of knowledge, trade, and war between China and other parts of the world from the fifteenth century to the present. It explores how knowledge from and to China and trade and wars between China and other countries have changed Chinese and other societies in the early modern and modern periods. Topics include the tributary system, science and technology, Confucianism, Christianity, Westernization, nationalism, revolution, migration, and communism. This course will focus on three themes: globalization, imperialism, and modernity.

Instructor:  Fang Yu Hu

 

4000-Level Courses

A seminar primarily intended for advanced majors in history or a related field. Focusing on specific topics in American, European, or World history, the course will help students master topics such as historiographical debate, analysis of historical evidence, and current historical methodologies.

Instructor:  William Kuby

A survey of the history of European women in the medieval and early modern eras. Topics covered will include pre-modern ideas about gender and women; women’s role in and relationship to religion; women’s work; women’s position within the household; the effect of class, marital status, and urban vs. rural residence on women; the emergence of women’s rights; and the effect of historical changes such as the Reformation and capitalism on the condition of women. 

Instructor:  Michelle White

What are the differences between pre-modern magic and medicine? Is there a line between proper and improper practice? How did one navigate between ideas of the body and cosmos? We will wrestle with these questions and more in this course that will explore different avenues of medicine and magic from antiquity to the mid-seventeenth century. This class will be structured as a reading colloquium, which will focus primarily on reading and discussion of the weekly topics. Over the course of the semester, we will investigate topics such as humoral medicine, cause and healing of disease, astrological medicine, physiognomy, and divination.

Instructor:  Kira Robison

Designed to provide practical experience with the materials and problems encountered by history professionals outside the traditional academic setting. Placements will be arranged on an individual basis.

Requires University Honors approval. Department may have additional prerequisite requirements. Student must submit an Individual Studies/Research Contract to the Records Office at the time of registration. 

 

Courses by Subject/Region

U.S. History Courses

A survey of American History from the age of discovery to the present, with special attention to the peoples, ideas, and cultures that created the United States.

Satisfies the following General Education Requirement:  Historical Understanding

A survey of American History from the age of discovery to the present, with special attention to the peoples, ideas, and cultures that created the United States.

Satisfies the following General Education Requirement:  Historical Understanding

An examination of political, economic, and social aspects of the recent past, including post-World War II readjustments, the Cold War, the Kennedy years, the Vietnam trauma, and the downfall of the “imperial presidency.” 

Satisfies the following General Education Requirement:  Historical Understanding

Instructor:  William Kuby

This class will explore United States history from roughly 1790 to 1850, the period between the achievement of a stable, independent nation and the unraveling of that nation over the issue of slavery. Students will read about, discuss, and write about the major themes of these decades: emergence of political parties, international conflict, rise of a market economy, expansion (and contraction) of democracy, geographic expansion, and contentious issues of class, race, gender, and social reform. 

Instructor:  Norton Wheeler

Who gets to have a childhood in American history?  Are all childhoods equal?  How does exclusion, discrimination, and oppression shape the lives of nonwhite youth?  Addressing these questions chronologically, this course surveys American children’s experiences and conditions from the first colonies to recent times.  Through primarily the eyes of children and youth, each assigned reading and class discussion will illustrate the changing circumstances of children’s lives and societal attitudes toward youth.  The course’s analytical arch centers on young people’s perspectives and recorded accounts including diaries, memoirs, and oral histories.  Students will also examine children’s material culture (toys, dress codes, and furniture); institutions and spaces (schools, recreational sites, the work place, and the streets); and media (children’s books, advertisements, comics, historical photographs, archived correspondence, and documentaries).  Balancing chronological breadth and a broad range of course topics, students will investigate and compare the lives of American youth during slavery, the Civil War, the interwar and Great Depression era, 1960s freedom struggles, and postwar urban American life.

Instructor:  Susan Eckelmann Berghel

This course explores the history of the southern Appalachian region from the pre-Columbian era through the 21st century.  It focuses on the extent to which perceptions of Appalachia have reflected historical realities and how the relationship between the region, the United States, and the world has changed over time.

Instructor:  Luke Manget

 

European History Courses

This course surveys important themes and developments of European history from the beginning of the French Revolution to approximately the turn of the twenty-first century. Topics covered may include the balance of power in Europe and international relations; the rise of imperialism; the spread of industrial society; the problems of world wars and reconstruction; the decline of European colonial systems, and the diplomacy of the Cold War.

Satisfies the following General Education Requirement:  Historical Understanding

Instructor:  Boris Gorshkov

The history of Britain from the earliest times to the present; the first semester emphasizing constitutional and institutional developments to 1660; the second semester, the growth of political democracy, the British Empire, economic and social change.

Instructor:  James Guilfoyle

This course will examine female spirituality and devotional practices in medieval Europe from 1200-1550, and the social and political circumstances that caused some women to be identified as holy, while others were persecuted as heretics.

Cross-listed with Women's Studies.

Instructor:  Amy Huesman

Since the early twentieth century most countries in Europe define themselves as nation-states, but most of them are not ethnically homogeneous. Two of the largest minorities in Eastern Europe before 1945 were Jews and Germans. Today one of the largest groups is the Roma. In this course you will learn how Central and Eastern Europe became a series of nation-states with numerous national, ethnic, and religious minorities. During Spring Break we will travel to Slovakia to meet representatives of the Hungarian minority in Slovakia, and we will visit communities in Hungary that were once German and some that are mainly inhabited by Roma. We will also meet with members of the Jewish community in Hungary and learn about how they are today one of the largest Jewish communities in Europe after the Holocaust. Students taking this course will also be required to travel with the class to Slovakia and Hungary during Spring Break 2018. 

Instructor:  John Swanson

A survey of the history of European women in the medieval and early modern eras. Topics covered will include pre-modern ideas about gender and women; women’s role in and relationship to religion; women’s work; women’s position within the household; the effect of class, marital status, and urban vs. rural residence on women; the emergence of women’s rights; and the effect of historical changes such as the Reformation and capitalism on the condition of women. 

Instructor:  Michelle White

What are the differences between pre-modern magic and medicine? Is there a line between proper and improper practice? How did one navigate between ideas of the body and cosmos? We will wrestle with these questions and more in this course that will explore different avenues of medicine and magic from antiquity to the mid-seventeenth century. This class will be structured as a reading colloquium, which will focus primarily on reading and discussion of the weekly topics. Over the course of the semester, we will investigate topics such as humoral medicine, cause and healing of disease, astrological medicine, physiognomy, and divination.

Instructor:  Kira Robison

 

World History Courses

This course will introduce students to human achievements in Eurasia, Africa, and the Americas from the origins of civilization to about the year 1400. Rather than taking a strictly chronological approach to civilizations and cultures, it will emphasize emerging cultures, traditions, and religions both as expressions of their time and place and as meaningful in our modern world.

Satisfies the following General Education requirements:  Historical Understanding; Non-Western; and Thoughts, Values, and Beliefs

This course will focus on the evolution of multiple, autonomous cultural centers within Africa, Eurasia, and the Americas prior to 1400 to an interconnected global system in the present. Topics covered include exploration, colonialism, responses to industrialization, the spread of the nation-state, the rise of modern science, the impact of a global economy, ethnicity and nationalism, migration, and mass culture.

Satisfies the following General Education Requirements:  Historical Understanding; Non-Western Cultures

This course is an introduction to the history of Latin America in and part of the modern world from the Bourbon reforms (1760s) and independence movements (1810s) to the present (2010s). The course covers political and economic regimes and transformations, as well as social and cultural movements, and environmental concerns, and will travel from the deserts of the US-Mexico border to the Amazon rain-forest and the glacial archipelago of Patagonia.

Instructor:  Ryan Edwards

This course will allow students to explore African history methods and literature by looking at the history of disease, health, and healing in Africa from pre-colonial times to the present. We will look at the changing ways African people and states have conceived of and responded to relationships between human and natural environment, between individual and collective wellbeing, and between bodily and social health. We will critically analyze how scholars’ choices of sources and scope reflect, challenge, or obscure these understandings.

Instructor:  Julia Cummiskey

This course examines the exchange of knowledge, trade, and war between China and other parts of the world from the fifteenth century to the present. It explores how knowledge from and to China and trade and wars between China and other countries have changed Chinese and other societies in the early modern and modern periods. Topics include the tributary system, science and technology, Confucianism, Christianity, Westernization, nationalism, revolution, migration, and communism. This course will focus on three themes: globalization, imperialism, and modernity.

Instructor:  Fang Yu Hu

 

Core & Departmental Courses

Introduction to principles and practices of historical research and writing. Emphasizes research methods and techniques, analysis of source material, construction of historical arguments, and effective written presentation of material in multiple contexts.

Satisfies the following General Education Requirement:  Rhetoric & Writing/Composition II

A seminar primarily intended for advanced majors in history or a related field. Focusing on specific topics in American, European, or World history, the course will help students master topics such as historiographical debate, analysis of historical evidence, and current historical methodologies.

Instructor:  William Kuby

Designed to provide practical experience with the materials and problems encountered by history professionals outside the traditional academic setting. Placements will be arranged on an individual basis.

Requires University Honors approval. Department may have additional prerequisite requirements. Student must submit an Individual Studies/Research Contract to the Records Office at the time of registration.

 

General Education Courses

This course will introduce students to human achievements in Eurasia, Africa, and the Americas from the origins of civilization to about the year 1400. Rather than taking a strictly chronological approach to civilizations and cultures, it will emphasize emerging cultures, traditions, and religions both as expressions of their time and place and as meaningful in our modern world.

Satisfies the following General Education requirements:  Historical Understanding; Non-Western; and Thoughts, Values, and Beliefs

This course will focus on the evolution of multiple, autonomous cultural centers within Africa, Eurasia, and the Americas prior to 1400 to an interconnected global system in the present. Topics covered include exploration, colonialism, responses to industrialization, the spread of the nation-state, the rise of modern science, the impact of a global economy, ethnicity and nationalism, migration, and mass culture.

Satisfies the following General Education Requirements:  Historical Understanding; Non-Western Cultures

A survey of American History from the age of discovery to the present, with special attention to the peoples, ideas, and cultures that created the United States.

Satisfies the following General Education Requirement:  Historical Understanding

A survey of American History from the age of discovery to the present, with special attention to the peoples, ideas, and cultures that created the United States.

Satisfies the following General Education Requirement:  Historical Understanding

Introduction to principles and practices of historical research and writing. Emphasizes research methods and techniques, analysis of source material, construction of historical arguments, and effective written presentation of material in multiple contexts.

Satisfies the following General Education Requirement:  Rhetoric & Writing/Composition II

This course surveys important themes and developments of European history from the beginning of the French Revolution to approximately the turn of the twenty-first century. Topics covered may include the balance of power in Europe and international relations; the rise of imperialism; the spread of industrial society; the problems of world wars and reconstruction; the decline of European colonial systems, and the diplomacy of the Cold War.

Satisfies the following General Education Requirement:  Historical Understanding

Instructor:  Boris Gorshkov

An examination of political, economic, and social aspects of the recent past, including post-World War II readjustments, the Cold War, the Kennedy years, the Vietnam trauma, and the downfall of the “imperial presidency.” 

Satisfies the following General Education Requirement:  Historical Understanding

Instructor:  William Kuby