Course Descriptions, Objectives & Outcomes

UTC's English Composition Program offers three courses to help students meet general education requirements and develop the critical thinking, analysis, and writing skills necessary for academic success.


English 1010 and 1011: Rhetoric and Composition I

English 1010 focuses on critical reading and strategies for varying writing style, tone, and form for multiple purposes and audiences. Students learn to compose texts, including academic essays, that clearly assert a claim and support the claim with compelling evidence.

An alternative to English 1010, English 1011 provides students with an additional 75-minute tutorial per week to help them achieve the program’s critical reading, analysis, and writing goals.

The course challenges students to…

  • Understand and analyze conventions for purpose, audience, and genre, understanding that genres evolve in response to changes in material conditions and composing technologies.
  • Create rhetorically appropriate work that demonstrates an understanding of purpose, audience, context, and genre conventions.
  • Practice varying strategies for composition, using self-evaluation to recognize that writing processes are recursive and flexible.
  • Analyze, synthesize, and evaluate information from various non-scholarly texts, attending especially to relationships between assertion and evidence and to patterns of organization.
 

By the end of the course, students will have…

  1. Used varying strategies of writing processes in composing course projects, including working effectively in peer groups to give and receive substantive feedback on emerging drafts.
  2. Practiced rhetorical analysis of genre conventions of multiple types of work that demonstrates an understanding of purpose, audience, and context of the genre convention.
  3. Composed a finished project that substantially and effectively analyzes, incorporates, and attributes credible texts produced by others.
  4. Reflected on and described students’ individual writing processes and how they contribute to students’ continued literacy development.

English 1020: Rhetoric and Composition II

English 1020 helps students build on their reading, analysis, and writing skills to develop complex written arguments based on careful evaluation and synthesis of information from research.  

The course challenges students to…

  • Understand the writer’s own individual writing process and to articulate how that process is recursive and flexible and contributes to their own literacy.
  • Create rhetorically appropriate work that demonstrates an understanding of purpose, audience, context, and genre conventions.
  • Understand, analyze, and negotiate conventions for purpose, audience, and genre, understanding that genres evolve in response to changes in material conditions and composing technologies and attending carefully to emergent conventions.
  • Analyze, synthesize, interpret, and evaluate ideas, information, situations, and texts, with attention paid to evaluating sources and evidence, recognizing and evaluating underlying assumptions, reading across texts for connections and patterns, identifying and evaluating chains of reasoning, and composing appropriately qualified and developed claims and generalizations.
 

By the end of the course, students will have…

  1. Adapted composing processes for a variety of technologies and modalities and reflected on the development of composing practices and how those practices influence their work.
  2. Read a diverse range of texts, attending especially to relationships between assertion and evidence, to patterns of organization, to the interplay between verbal and nonverbal elements, and to how these features function for different audiences and situations.
  3. Used strategies—such as interpretation, synthesis, response, critique, and design/redesign—to compose texts that integrate the writer's ideas with those from appropriate scholarly and non-scholarly sources.
  4. Located and evaluated (for credibility, sufficiency, accuracy, timeliness, bias and so on) primary and secondary research materials, including journal articles and essays, books, scholarly and professionally established and maintained databases or archives, and informal electronic networks and internet sources.
  5. Engaged in multiple genres, applying rhetorically appropriate composing, citation, and design features.