Freshman and Transfer AIQ Guides 

Academic Advisors will preregister incoming freshmen and transfer students for two or more fall courses based on major, placement scores, and information provided to us in the AIQ. You will be given a copy of your schedule at Orientation where you will have the opportunity to speak with an Academic Advisor about your schedule, add additional courses, and make any necessary changes. Please contact the Center for Advisement at (423) 425-4573 with any questions regarding the Academic Interest Questionnaire (AIQ).

 

College of Arts and Sciences:

Department of Social, Cultural, and Justice Studies

The Department of Social, Cultural, and Justice Studies offers degrees in Sociology & Anthropology.  Students majoring in Sociology & Anthropology learn about the methods used to conduct and carry out social science research and gain valuable insight to cultural diversity which directly relates to an ever increasing global economy and society.  These degree programs will greatly serve students by teaching them to think critically, enabling them to enter a competitive job market and interact with people from diverse cultures.

 Anthropology is the study of humans in all times and places as well as the relationship between human biology and culture.  It is traditionally divided into four main subfields: cultural anthropology, physical anthropology, archaeology, and linguistic anthropology.  Students can select from two Anthropology major concentrations: A Baechelor of Arts (which requires both a foreign language and a minor) or a Bachelor of Science. 

We also offer a major concentration in Sociology. Sociology is the study of large scale social structures (like UTC) and how they impact human behavior. Sociologists investigate and study a wide range of topics including:  educational systems, mental health issues, and social relationships. Students will find that a degree in sociology can also equip them for careers in market research, and the business/marketing world.

Course Selection for Anthropology & Sociology Majors

Please use the following as a guide to which courses to select.

Rhetoric and Writing:

You will be registered for a Rhetoric and Writing course based on your ACT English sub-score and directed self-placement score.

Mathematics:

You will be registered for a Math course based on your chosen major and your highest Math ACT sub-score.

Natural Sciences:

Choose any course/courses that interest you. To register for a Natural Science course your first semester, you must have a Math ACT sub-score of at least 22. ANTH 1100 Biological Anthropology is an acceptable Natural Science with lab course (4 hrs) and those students pursuing a major in Anthropology are advised to take this course.  It is only taught in the Fall.

Fine Arts & Humanities:

  • Historical Understanding Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Literature Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Thoughts, Values, & Beliefs Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Visual and Performing Arts Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Non-Western Culture:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Behavioral & Social Sciences:

Choose any course/courses that interest you, excluding Sociology or Anthropology courses.

Additional Courses for Anthropology and Sociology Majors

Along with your general education courses you will be automatically registered for either ANTH 1200: Cultural Anthropology or SOC 1510: Introduction to Sociology based on your selected major.

You will not need to choose this course on the AIQ.

Additional details about this major are available on the departmental website, in the undergraduate catalog, and on the ClearPath for Advising.

The Department of Art has several degree offerings. For the first year student, you have the choice to register as a Pre-BFA Art, which prepares you for entering into our competitive concentrations in Painting and Drawing, Graphic Design, Photography and Media Art, and Sculpture. We offer a noncompetitive degree, the BA in Art, which has three concentrations: Art Education, Art History and Studio. The BA in Art allows students to take a variety of art courses while pursuing a minor in an area outside of art. Upon successful completion of the BA Art: Art Education degree you are certified to teach Art in Tennessee at the K-12 level. 

Art courses provide opportunities to explore creativity, develop skills, learn about the history of art and become more critically engaged in the world. We provide an atmosphere of support and mentorship as students learn to master a variety of art forms, articulate their ideas carefully, and solve complex problems. Ultimately our graduates are well prepared to enter into a competitive yet deeply rewarding profession.

For more information please visit http://www.utcart.com/

 

Course Selection for Art Majors

Please use the following as a guide to which courses to select.

Rhetoric and Writing

You will be registered for a Rhetoric and Writing course based on your ACT English sub-score and directed self-placement score.

Mathematics:

You will be registered for a Math course based on your chosen major and your highest Math ACT sub-score.

Natural Sciences:

Choose any courses you are interested in. Many Natural Science courses require a Math ACT sub-score of at least 22 or completion of College Algebra or higher.

Fine Arts & Humanities:

  • Historical Understanding Subcategory: Art 2140 is required during your sophomore year. Do not register for a Historical Understanding subcategory at this time.
  • Literature Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Thoughts, Values, & Beliefs Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Visual and Performing Arts Subcategory: Art 2150 is required during your sophomore year. Do not register for a Visual and Performing Arts subcategory at this time. 

Non-Western Culture:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Behavioral & Social Sciences:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Additional Courses for Art Majors

Along with your general education courses, you will be registered for ART 1000: Introduction to Contemporary Art Practices, ART 1010: Visual Students 1, and ART 1050: Drawing 1.

You will not need to choose these courses on the AIQ.

Additional details about this major are available on the departmental website, in the undergraduate catalog, and on the ClearPath for Advising.

Biology involves the study of living organisms, including their structure, function, evolution, distribution, and relationships.  If you want to become a physician, dentist, veterinarian, physician assistant, research scientist, field biologist, molecular biologist, middle or high school science teacher, natural resource manager, or are just interested in learning about living organisms, then majoring in Biology would be an ideal choice for you. The Department of Biology, Geology and Environmental Sciences offers three Biology major concentrations: General Biology, Preprofessional, and STEM Education.

Biology can be a challenging subject for many students.  Predictors of success include:

  • 4 years of math in high school
  • A or B in high school biology
  • Math subscore on the ACT of 22 or above
  • A strong work ethic
  • A high school curriculum that encouraged studying and critical thinking
  • Strong writing and organizational skills

Once you have graduated with a biology degree from UTC, you have various choices depending on your interests. Many of our graduates choose to attend graduate school (in biology, biomedicine, and environmental science), medical school, dental school, veterinary school, optometry school, pharmacy school, or to receive physician assistant training.  Others go immediately into a job as a field or laboratory biologist or teacher.  The program in Biology at UTC is designed to prepare students for success in all of these careers.

 

Course Selection for Biology Majors

Please use the following as a guide to which courses to select.

Rhetoric and Writing

You will be registered for a Rhetoric and Writing course based on your ACT English sub-score and directed self-placement score.

Mathematics:

You will be registered for a Math course based on your chosen major and your highest Math ACT sub-score.

Natural Sciences:

  • If you wish to prepare for medical school, dental school, pharmacy school, or other health professions or you wish to do work that may have a biological emphasis, then choose both BIOL 1110 & CHEM 1110.
  • If you do not plan to do any work at the interface of biology or medicine, or if you just feel unprepared to take two laboratory sciences your first semester, then choose only CHEM 1110
  • If you did not take four years of math in high school and/or made less than a 22 on the math section of the ACT, your math preparation may prevent you from being successful in BIOL 1110 or CHEM 1110. If your math skills are weak, you should complete a college level math course before taking BIOL 1110 or CHEM 1110.

Fine Arts & Humanities:

  • Historical Understanding Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Literature Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Thoughts, Values, & Beliefs Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Visual and Performing Arts Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Non-Western Culture:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Behavioral & Social Sciences:

Choose any course/courses that interest you. We recommend SOC 1510 and PSY 1010 for Biology: Preprofessional.  

Additional details about this major are available on the departmental website, in the undergraduate catalog, and on the ClearPath for Advising.

Chemistry offers the molecular perspective upon which much of modern medicine, environmental studies, energy research, biochemistry, material science, and contemporary technology are based. If you want to become a medical doctor, pharmacist, dentist, optometrist, physician assistant, research scientist, science teacher, chemical industry employee, worker in a chemical laboratory, or just want to understand the world around you, then majoring in Chemistry would be an ideal choice for you.

The program in Chemistry at UTC is accredited by the American Chemical Society and designed to prepare students for many different careers. The chemistry curriculum provides programs leading to the BS Chemistry degree, BS Biochemistry degree, or BS Chemistry: STEM Education degree. Students interested in becoming medical doctors, dentists, or pharmacists often choose the BS Biochemistry degree option. For more information about the degree options in Chemistry or for more information about graduate school, preparation for health careers, preparation for applying to medical/dental/pharmacy school, pre-professional advising, or courses, go to the department website: http://www.utc.edu/chemistry-physics/

 General Chemistry can be a challenging subject for many students. Predictors of success include:

  • 4 years of math in high school
  • A or B in high school biology and chemistry
  • Math subscore on the ACT of 22 or above
  • A willingness to read the textbook, work homework problems, and study your class notes, for a total of about nine hours of work per week on the classroom portion of General Chemistry.
  • A high school curriculum that encouraged studying and critical thinking

Course Selection for Chemistry Majors

Please use the following as a guide to which courses to select.

Rhetoric and Writing

You will be registered for a Rhetoric and Writing course based on your ACT English sub-score and directed self-placement score.

Mathematics:

You will be registered for a Math course based on your chosen major and your highest Math ACT sub-score.

Natural Sciences:

  • If you wish to prepare for medical school, dental school, pharmacy school, or other health professions or you wish to do work that may have a biological emphasis, then choose both BIOL 1110/1110L & CHEM 1110/1110L.
  • If you do not plan to do any work at the interface of biology or medicine, or if you just feel unprepared to take two laboratory sciences your first semester, then choose only CHEM 1110.
  • If you did not take four years of math in high school and/ or made less than a 22 on the math section of the ACT, your math preparation may prevent you from being successful in General Chemistry I (CHEM 1110/1110 L). If your math skills are weak, you should complete a college level math course before taking CHEM 1110/1110L.

Fine Arts & Humanities:

  • Historical Understanding Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Literature Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Thoughts, Values, & Beliefs Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Visual and Performing Arts Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Non-Western Culture:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Behavioral & Social Sciences:

If you wish to prepare for medical school, dental school, pharmacy school, or other health professions or you wish to do work that may have a biological emphasis, then PSY 1010 and SOC 1510 are suitable choices.

If you do not plan to do any work at the interface of biology or medicine, then choose any course/courses of interested.

Additional details about this major are also available in the undergraduate catalog and on the ClearPath for Advising.

The Department of Communication program is one of 109 accredited journalism and mass communication programs in the U.S. and Puerto Rico.

Students receive a solid foundation in the liberal arts and sciences, as well as the knowledge and skills required for success in a wide variety of professions.

Majors complete a 21-hour core of seven courses and select electives that allow for focused learning in a specific professional area to complete the 33-hour major. Courses include media writing, persuasive writing, audio and video production, web production, documentary production, publication design, television news production, advanced reporting, feature writing and others.  The internship program provides opportunities for experience in a variety of communication fields.

Graduates work in professional fields such as print and broadcast journalism, magazine production, public relations, advertising, broadcast production, Web development and design, multi-media production and presentation, corporate communications, media relations, television and film industries, and many, many others.

For more information, please visit the Department of Communication website.

 

Course Selection for Communication Majors

Please use the following as a guide to which courses to select.

Rhetoric and Writing

You will be registered for a Rhetoric and Writing course based on your ACT English sub-score and directed self-placement score.

Mathematics:

You will be registered for a Math course based on your chosen major and your highest Math ACT sub-score.

Natural Sciences:

Choose any courses you are interested in. Many Natural Science courses require a Math ACT sub-score of at least 22 or completion of College Algebra or higher.

Fine Arts & Humanities:

  • Historical Understanding Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Literature Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Thoughts, Values, & Beliefs Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Visual and Performing Arts Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Non-Western Culture:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Behavioral & Social Sciences:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Additional Courses for Communication Majors

Along with your general education courses, you will be registered for COMM 1010: Introduction to Mass Communication.

You will not need to choose this course on the AIQ.

Additional details about this major are available on the departmental website, in the undergraduate catalog, and on the ClearPath for Advising.

Most jobs in criminal justice require working with victims and/or offenders who may be very different from you and come from very diverse backgrounds. You should enjoy working with people and be able to work with people who come from a variety of different backgrounds.

Related to a major in Criminal Justice:

  • Are you interested in understanding how the criminal justice system works to respond to victims and offenders? Can you think abstractly about concepts such as criminality and victimization? Would you like to be on the front lines of creating, defining, and enforcing laws as they relate to the criminal justice system? This major challenges students to think about crime from a very broad perspective including topics like corporate misconduct, violence, and organized and/or street crime.
  • This major will prepare you to work in law enforcement on the local, state, and federal level. It is not “cop training” but should you desire to work in an investigatory role (homicide detective, federal agent, local sheriff, etc.) this major will prepare you for that role.
  • While the major does not require a foreign language, students who become proficient are in high demand. Utilizing elective hours to obtain foreign language skills can be very beneficial for a student of Criminal Justice.

What Can I do with Criminal Justice if I do not wish to go into law enforcement?  

  • Law School – While the major is not designed as a pre-law program, students have the opportunity to learn legal concepts, how the criminal justice system functions from the legal perspective, and preparation for law school. This includes internships in the community. Criminal Justice is a degree that will absolutely prepare a student to enter law school upon graduation.  
  • Forensics - (crime investigation similar to those shown on CSI programs) is not a focus most criminal justice programs, including ours, have. These jobs are somewhat limited and often require a chemistry background. Students wishing to become medical examiners or forensic pathologists can find the major an excellent fit. The versatile degree provides in depth instruction on the criminal justice system and the needed elective space to take required science courses for medical school or graduate programs in forensic pathology.
  • Corrections and Victim Advocacy- Students learn about the corrections system and will be well prepared to work in the field upon graduation. There is also an increasing demand for victim advocates in non-profit organizations and in connection to the justice system. This program will give students information on populations they would serve, preparing them for careers in these fields.

 

Course Selection for Criminal Justice Majors

Please use the following as a guide to which courses to select.

Rhetoric and Writing

You will be registered for a Rhetoric and Writing course based on your ACT English sub-score and directed self-placement score.

Mathematics:

You will be registered for a Math course based on your chosen major and your highest Math ACT sub-score.

Students interested in forensic pathology or working as a medical examiner are encouraged to take MATH 1130

Natural Sciences:

Choose any course/courses that interest you. To register for a Natural Science course your first semester, you must have a Math ACT sub-score of at least 22. 

Students with an interest forensic pathology or working as a medical examiner are encouraged to take BIOL 1110/1120: General Biology I & II and/or CHEM 1110/1120: General Chemistry I & II

Fine Arts & Humanities:

  • Historical Understanding Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Literature Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Thoughts, Values, & Beliefs Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Visual and Performing Arts Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Non-Western Culture:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Behavioral & Social Sciences:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Additional Courses for Criminal Justice Majors

Along with your general education courses you will be automatically registered for one, if not two of the following courses:

  • CRMJ 1100: Introduction to Criminal Justice
  • CRMJ 2100: Criminology

You will not need to choose these courses on the AIQ.

Additional details about this major are available on the departmental website, in the undergraduate catalog, and on the ClearPath for Advising.

Being an English major at UTC means that students have an opportunity to work with outstanding faculty who are specialists in their areas of research and teaching. The English Department teaches students both to read and write maturely and correctly on the literal level and also to interpret and use figurative language. In the classroom, that role is carried out through studies in composition; language, rhetoric and writing, literature, criticism; and creative writing.

Every aspect of the English Department’s program attempts to communicate a sense of wonder and excitement about our written culture and to engage the student’s imagination. We make students aware that whenever they read or write, complex and sometimes contradictory elements factual, emotive, logical must be apprehended, held in balance, and accorded appropriate weight. We want them to be able to identify and order intricate responses to arrive at a sound understanding of a written text or to produce clear and forceful writing of their own.

What students learn in the English Department adds to their inventory of competencies and enriches their experience of life. We recognize that the ability to understand and produce good writing is an invaluable mental resource.

The English Department currently offers three different plans for you to follow:

  • English and American Language and Literature, B.A.
  • English and American Language and Literature: Creative Writing, B.A.
  • English and American Language and Literature: Rhetoric and Professional Writing B.A

 

Course Selection for English Majors

Please use the following as a guide to which courses to select.

Rhetoric and Writing

You will be registered for a Rhetoric and Writing course based on your ACT English sub-score and directed self-placement score.

Mathematics:

You will be registered for a Math course based on your chosen major and your highest Math ACT sub-score.

Natural Sciences:

Choose any course/courses that interest you. To register for a Natural Science course your first semester, you must have a Math ACT sub-score of at least 22. 

Fine Arts & Humanities:

  • Historical Understanding Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Literature Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Thoughts, Values, & Beliefs Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Visual and Performing Arts Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Non-Western Culture:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Behavioral & Social Sciences:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Additional Courses for English Majors

If you will have already received credit for ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020, along with your general education courses, you will possibly be registered for either ENGL 2010: Introduction to Literary Analysis or ENGL 2050: Introduction to Rhetorical Analysis.

You will not need to choose this course on the AIQ. 

Additional details about this major are available on the departmental website, in the undergraduate catalog, and on the ClearPath for Advising.

Environmental Science involves the interdisciplinary study of relationships between living organisms, including humans, and the environment.  If you want to become a research scientist, environmental scientist, environmental lawyer, water quality specialist, environmental manager, natural resource manager, regulatory specialist, environmental policy analyst, non-governmental organization manager, geographic information system specialist, middle or high school science teacher, sustainability specialist, or are just interested in learning about environmental issues, then majoring in Environmental Science would be an ideal choice for you.

Environmental Science can be a challenging subject for many students.  Predictors of success include:

  1. 4 years of math in high school
  2. An A or B in high school biology or environmental science
  3. A Math sub score on the ACT of 22 or above
  4. A strong work ethic
  5. A high school curriculum that encouraged studying and critical thinking
  6. Strong writing and organizational skills

Once you have graduated with an Environmental Science degree from UTC, you have various choices depending on your interests. Many of our graduates choose to attend graduate school in environmental science, biology, environmental law and policy, land use planning, or natural resource and environmental management.  Others go immediately into a job as wildlife biologists, middle and high school science teachers, natural resource managers, environmental consultants, geographic information specialists, non-profit scientists and managers, and environmental technicians.  The program in Environmental Science at UTC is designed to prepare students for success in all of these careers.

Environmental Science (ESC) offers six programs for you to choose from:

  • BS ESC: Biodiversity
  • BS ESC: Earth, Atmosphere , and Geological Resources
  • BS ESC: Engineering Science
  • BS ESC: Environmental Health
  • BS ESC: Environmental Policy and Planning
  • BS ESC: Geographic and Cartographic

 

Course Selection for Environmental Science Majors

Please use the following as a guide to which courses to select.

Rhetoric and Writing:

You will be registered for a Rhetoric and Writing course based on your ACT English sub-score and directed self-placement score.

Mathematics:

You will be registered for a Math course based on your chosen major and your highest Math ACT sub-score.

Natural Sciences:

As an Environmental Science major, you will take the Environmental Science core curriculum that begins with ESC 1500 and ESC 1500L: Introduction to Environmental Science I with lab. Please choose ESC 1500 in the AIQ.

If you did not take four years of math in high school and/or made less than a 22 on the math section of the ACT, your math preparation may prevent you from being successful in science. If your math skills are weak, you should complete a Math course before taking science, and you should not choose a Natural Science course.

Fine Arts & Humanities:

  • Historical Understanding Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Literature Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Thoughts, Values, & Beliefs Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Visual and Performing Arts Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Non-Western Culture:

ESC Geographic and Cartographic Sciences requires GEOG 1030. All other concentrations may choose any coursesof interest.

Behavioral & Social Sciences:

ESC Policy and Planning requires ECON 1010 and 1020 or POLS 1010, 1020, or 1030 for Social Science. All other concentrations may choose any coursesof interest.

Additional Courses for Environmental Science Major:

You may be enrolled in courses in addition to your General Education courses. Additional courses will vary depending on chosen Environmental Science concentration. 

You will not need to choose this course on the AIQ.

Additional details about this major are available on the departmental website, in the undergraduate catalog, and on the ClearPath for Advising.

The mission of the Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures is to teach the languages and cultures of a variety of peoples.

In the Modern Languages, the faculty assists students in achieving proficiency appropriate to their level of study in each of the basic skills of living in a language: speaking, writing, listening comprehension and reading proficiency.

In the Classical Languages, the faculty assists students in achieving sufficient mastery of reading, writing, and translation skills so they can profitably approach texts that are fundamental to an in-depth understanding of Greek and Roman cultures, the basis of what is known as Western Civilization.

Through the study of a foreign language, the faculty endeavors to make students aware of the relationship between language and culture. The faculty also encourages students to engage in study abroad programs. This allows them to experience first-hand the language and culture they are studying.

In addition to being engaged in many scholarly and professional development activities, faculty members in the Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures participate in the life of the institution through work in a variety of committees and task forces. They provide their professional skills in community service projects, consultation for local schools, the courts, the criminal justice system, regional health providers, local and regional businesses, and other government and private entities.

 

Course Selection for Foreign Language Majors

Please use the following as a guide to which courses to select.

Rhetoric and Writing:

You will be registered for a Rhetoric and Writing course based on your ACT English sub-score and directed self-placement score.

Mathematics:

You will be registered for a Math course based on your chosen major and your highest Math ACT sub-score.

Natural Sciences:

Choose any course/courses you are interested in. To register for a Natural Science course your first semester, you must have a Math ACT sub-score of at least 22.

Fine Arts & Humanities:

  • Historical Understanding Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Literature Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Thoughts, Values, & Beliefs Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Visual and Performing Arts Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Non-Western Culture:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Behavioral & Social Sciences:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Additional Courses for Foreign Language Majors
Along with your general education courses you will be automatically registered for a language course based on placement results. All students should take the placement test to ensure enrollment into the appropriate level of course. More information on placement can be found online.

Additional details about this major are available on the departmental website, in the undergraduate catalog, and on the ClearPath for Advising.

Geoscientists study the physical aspects of the Earth, such as its composition, structure, and processes, to learn about its past, present, and future. The interaction of surface rocks with water, soil and organisms is a study of environmental geoscientists and hydrologists alike. Through research based on field examination and laboratory work, geoscientists find new relationships that contribute to the understanding of the natural environment. Geoscientists with first or subsequent degrees work in numerous private and public agencies and education facilities and contribute to the betterment of society.

The geology program at UTC is designed to help the student develop a career in one of several opportunities described above. A faculty with diverse areas of interest offers courses that provide a well-rounded undergraduate degree in classical geology or geology with an emphasis in environmental geology. All graduates will gain experience examining rocks in the field, collecting data in the field and in the laboratory by using instruments at our department or in other facilities, and will learn the common methods used for interpreting geological data. Also, the department offers field courses, which culminate in a ten-day field study of geology in the US desert, the US southwest, or Costa Rica in alternate years. Two scholarships managed by the department are offered to deserving and qualified majors.  Our graduates enter the work force after a first degree or pursue graduate school. Some students participate in undergraduate research and present their work at the geological society meetings. 

The Geology program offers three concentrations for you to choose from: Geology, Environmental Geology or Geology: STEM (certification for High School Teaching).

For more information about the Geology Program visit our website at:  http://www.utc.edu/Academic/geology/ 

 

Course Selection for Geology Majors

Please use the following as a guide to which courses to select.

Rhetoric and Writing:

You will be registered for a Rhetoric and Writing course based on your ACT English sub-score and directed self-placement score.

Mathematics:

You will be registered for a Math course based on your chosen major and your highest Math ACT sub-score.

Natural Sciences:

GEOL 1110/1110L is required.

Fine Arts & Humanities:

  • Historical Understanding Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Literature Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Thoughts, Values, & Beliefs Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Visual and Performing Arts Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Non-Western Culture:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Behavioral & Social Sciences:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Additional details about this major are available on the departmental website, in the undergraduate catalog, and on the ClearPath for Advising.

Do you enjoy history but are hesitant to declare the major? Many students love the discipline of history but do not wish to teach or become a historian, so think the major is not for them. As a student of history you can pursue many careers in:

  • Law: The argumentative writing style history majors learn is extremely beneficial for those with law school aspirations. As a history student, you will learn how to prove your point through detailed examples and proper citation. Students who pursue law careers are often better prepared when they come from a history background.
  • Government/Business: History not only gives its students excellent writing skills, but also encourages them to be accomplished public speakers. Through presentations at conferences, and in class discussion, history students at UTC master the art of public speaking. This skill will equip them to run for, and hold public office at any level of government. Being effective speakers also helps historians conquer the boardroom. Whether in business, law, or government the public speaking skills obtained by UTC history majors will help them excel in their chosen profession.
  • Healthcare: Many healthcare fields demand that their professionals can think on their feet and solve problems. The study of history equips students with those skills. Critical thinking is one of the most valuable lessons obtained by UTC history majors, honed through debate and classroom discussion. Those wishing to pursue healthcare, but love history, can still do so. The major offers flexible elective hours for students to complete required coursework for their healthcare graduate program, as well as challenges them to think outside the box.

Students who wish to make their historical study at UTC more of a direct feature in their career, but do not wish to teach can pursue many graduate school opportunities that are available:

  • Museum Sciences, students can go on to be curators in top museums around the world.
  • Library Sciences, which provides students the ability to preserve and oversee the display of books and documents of historical significance, also plays host to many history majors.
  • Students who wish to travel the world after they have studied history, have found employment with the United Nations, World Health Organization, the Peace Corps, and several other international agencies.
  • History majors have also enjoyed success in publishing and serving as public historians for communities around the nation.

For students who wish to teach the opportunities are endless. Whether in K-12 or higher education, a degree at UTC will equip students to be excellent educators. Majoring in history at UTC offers students opportunities to take a wide range of courses in European, American, and World history. Courses students could participate in include: East Asia in the Modern World, Under Hitler’s Shadow: Europe 1929-1945, and the History of Tennessee. Our highly-qualified and helpful faculty are committed to creating a culture of advisement and mentorship with their students. No matter their chosen career path a student of history at UTC can plan on being successful.

For more information please visit: www.utc.edu/history

 

Course Selection For History Majors

When you get to the course selection portion (AIQ) of the orientation application please use the following as a guide to which courses to select.

Rhetoric and Writing:

You will be registered for a Rhetoric and Writing course (English) based on your ACT English sub-score and Directed Self Placement score. If you have AP Language or Dual Enrollment credit for English 1010 and/or English 1020 please make sure you have indicated the course you have taken in the AP/Dual Enrollment section of the AIQ.

Mathematics:

You will be registered for a Math course based on your chosen major and your highest Math ACT sub-score.

Natural Sciences:

Choose any course/courses you are interested in. To register for a Natural Science course your first semester, you must have a Math ACT sub-score of at least 22.

Fine Arts & Humanities:

  • Historical Understanding Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Literature Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Thoughts, Values, & Beliefs Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Visual and Performing Arts Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Non-Western Culture: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Behavioral & Social Sciences: Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Additional Courses for History Majors
Along with your general education courses you will be automatically registered for one of the following:

  • HIST 1010: World History from Origins to 1000
  • HIST 1020: World History from 1000 to 1800
  • HIST 1030: World History from 1800 to Present

You will not need to choose this course on the AIQ.

Additional details about this major are available on the departmental website, in the undergraduate catalog, and on the ClearPath for Advising.

The humanities traditionally encompass those disciplines which pierce to the core of the human condition: philosophy, music, art, language and literature, religion, ethics, jurisprudence, and history. But the field of study for the humanities is becoming increasingly wider as the definitions of what constitutes and shapes “culture” broaden; some branches of the social sciences for instance, such as anthropology, political science, psychology, or archaeology, may also inform how the human person and the culture to which he or she belongs is to be understood.

Course Selection for Humanities Majors

Please use the following as a guide to which courses to select.

Rhetoric and Writing:

You will be registered for a Rhetoric and Writing course based on your ACT English sub-score and directed self-placement score.

Mathematics:

You will be registered for a Math course based on your chosen major and your highest Math ACT sub-score.

Natural Sciences:

Choose any course/courses you are interested in. To register for a Natural Science course your first semester, you must have a Math ACT sub-score of at least 22.

Fine Arts & Humanities:

  • Historical Understanding Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Literature Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Thoughts, Values, & Beliefs Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Visual and Performing Arts Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Non-Western Culture:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Behavioral & Social Sciences:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Additional details about this major are available on the departmental website, in the undergraduate catalog, and on the ClearPath for Advising.

The BS Mathematics degree at UTC has three concentrations: Actuarial Science, General Mathematics, and STEM Education. The core courses in each concentration are essentially the same, with the differences provided through a type of minor.

The Actuarial concentration requires coursework in Economics, Finance, and Mathematics which will prepare students who wish to become actuaries, primarily in the insurance field.

The STEM Education concentration prepares future high school teachers through a selection of modern educational theory and training courses, including field experiences. The director of the STEM Education program is a member of the School of Education, and you should contact that person as well as Mathematics (e.g. the Department Head) to prepare for your initial coursework.

The General concentration provides students the opportunity to choose their own minor in the field of their choice. Some popular choices are physical sciences like Physics or Chemistry, Computer Science, and Business Administration.

For more information please visit: www.utc.edu/math

 

Course Selection for Math Majors

Please use the following as a guide to which courses to select.

Rhetoric and Writing:

You will be registered for a Rhetoric and Writing course based on your ACT English sub-score and directed self-placement score.

Mathematics:

You will be registered for a Math course based on your chosen major and your highest Math ACT sub-score.  

Natural Sciences:

Choose any course/courses you are interested in. To register for a Natural Science course your first semester, you must have a Math ACT sub-score of at least 22.  We require PHYS 1030/L and PHYS 1040/L or PHSY 2300/2300L and PHYS 2310/2310L for Math: STEM Education majors. 

Fine Arts & Humanities:

  • Historical Understanding Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Literature Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Thoughts, Values, & Beliefs Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you. 
  • Visual and Performing Arts Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Non-Western Culture:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Behavioral & Social Sciences:

Choose any course/courses that interest you. Exception: ECON 1010 and 1020 are required for Actuarial Science majors.

Additional details about this major are available on the departmental website, in the undergraduate catalog, and on the ClearPath for Advising.

 

Admission to the university does not guarantee admission into the Department of Music as a major. Students intending to major in Music must complete a live audition for the Music faculty and pass a Music Theory Placement Exam in order to be admitted into the Music program. The audition determines the student’s readiness for college-level instrument or voice instruction. Students must pass the Theory Placement Exam with a score of 80% in order to enroll in Theory I and Ear Training I.

If you still need to audition and take the Theory Placement Exam, you may do this on the Friday before the first day of classes of the fall semester. 

For more information please visit: www.utc.edu/music

 

Course Selection for Music Majors

Please use the following as a guide to which courses to select.

Rhetoric and Writing:

You will be registered for a Rhetoric and Writing course based on your ACT English sub-score and directed self-placement score.

Mathematics:

You will be registered for a Math course based on your chosen major and your highest Math ACT sub-score.  

Natural Sciences:

Choose any course/courses you are interested in. To register for a Natural Science course your first semester, you must have a Math ACT sub-score of at least 22.  We require PHSY 2300/2300L and PHYS 2310/2310L for Math: STEM Education majors. 

Fine Arts & Humanities:

  • Historical Understanding Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Literature Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Thoughts, Values, & Beliefs Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you. 
  • Visual and Performing Arts Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Non-Western Culture:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Behavioral & Social Sciences:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Additional details about this major are available on the departmental website, in the undergraduate catalog, and on the ClearPath for Advising.

The Department of Philosophy and Religion offers a variety of courses in ethics, the history of philosophy, philosophical developments in the United States and Europe, religions of Asia and the West, and the history of the development of religious thought and practice.  Majors in our department choose one of three concentrations or tracks of study: (1) philosophy, (2) religious studies, or (3) a combination of philosophy and religion.  Our introductory courses require no previous training or course work in philosophy or religious studies, and are designed to help students at any level of experience to prepare themselves for more advanced work in both areas.  Our Senior Educational Experience is unique among academic departments at UTC, and provides our majors with the opportunity to complete a capstone project before they begin their post-graduate careers.  Our students engage in a complete intellectual life, including participation in our series of lectures from visiting scholars and the invitation to join our Philosophy Club, a campus organization that sponsors many extra-curricular activities

 

Course Selection for Philosophy & Religion Majors

Please use the following as a guide to which courses to select.

Rhetoric and Writing:

You will be registered for a Rhetoric and Writing course based on your ACT English sub-score and directed self-placement score.

Mathematics:

You will be registered for a Math course based on your chosen major and your highest Math ACT sub-score.

Natural Sciences:

Choose any course/courses you are interested in. To register for a Natural Science course your first semester, you must have a Math ACT sub-score of at least 22.

Fine Arts & Humanities:

  • Historical Understanding Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Literature Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Thoughts, Values, & Beliefs Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Visual and Performing Arts Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Non-Western Culture:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Behavioral & Social Sciences:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Additional Courses for Philosophy & Religion Majors

Along with your general education courses you will be automatically registered for major related course(s) based on you selected major. Students with a major in Philosophy would be registered for PHIL 2010: Introduction to Philosophy. Students with a major in Religious Students would be registered for REL1030: Introduction to the Study of Religion or REL 1100: Introduction to Western Religions. Those students who are majoring in a combined Philosophy and Religion concentration will be registered for one, if not two of the previously mentioned courses.

Additional details about this major are available on the departmental website, in the undergraduate catalog, and on the ClearPath for Advising.

A faculty of diverse interest areas offers courses that provide a well-rounded undergraduate degree in physics. All students take classical core courses, modern physics courses, data collection and analysis laboratory courses, and, when possible, research courses. Our observatory augments courses in Astronomy. Interested students may perform collaborative research with faculty and use equipment at our laboratories, at national laboratories such as at Oak Ridge and at Huntsville, and at other universities. Six separate scholarships managed by the department are offered to deserving and qualified majors.  Often our undergraduate program is a stepping stone for students who pursue graduate studies to become research scientists. Some students use their undergraduate physics degree to pursue allied programs in biophysics, biochemistry, engineering, or computer science. Another option is preparation for high school teaching through a Physics:STEM degree.

The Physics program offers three possible degree options: Physics, Biophysics, or Physics: STEM (Certification for High School Teaching)

 For more information about the Physics Program visit our website at: http://www.utc.edu/chemistry-physics/

 

Course Selection for Physics Majors

Please use the following as a guide to which courses to select.

Rhetoric and Writing:

You will be registered for a Rhetoric and Writing course based on your ACT English sub-score and directed self-placement score.

Mathematics:

You will be registered for a Math course based on your chosen major and your highest Math ACT sub-score.

Natural Sciences:

  • PHYS 2300/2300L: Principles of Physics – Mechanics and Heat (requires a Math ACT subscore of 28 or higher or additional math preparation prior to taking)
  • CHEM 1110/1110L: General Chemistry I (to take your first semester, you must have a Math ACT subscore of 22 or higher)

 Fine Arts & Humanities:

  • Historical Understanding Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Literature Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Thoughts, Values, & Beliefs Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Visual and Performing Arts Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Non-Western Culture:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Behavioral & Social Sciences:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Additional details about this major are available on the departmental website, in the undergraduate catalog, and on the ClearPath for Advising.

The Department's mission is to provide UTC undergraduates and graduate students with high quality instruction in the fields of Political Science, Public Administration and Nonprofit Management.

The Department offers five concentrations.  These concentrations include:  American Studies; International and Comparative Studies; Legal Studies; Public Policy; and Public Administration and Nonprofit Management.

The program is designed to achieve balance between theory and practice.  Students will acquire a better understanding of politics, will be able to analyze and evaluate policy issues and become familiar with various theoretical approaches in the social sciences.  Students will also become familiar with concepts and techniques relative to the management of public and nonprofit organizations.

The Political Science Department offers five programs of study for you to follow:

  • Political Science: American Studies, B.S.
  • Political Science: International & Comparative Studies, B.S.
  • Political Science: Legal Studies, B.S.
  • Political Science: Public Administration & Nonprofit Management, B.S.
  • Political Science: Public Policy & Administration, B.S.

 

Course Selection for Political Science Majors

Please use the following as a guide to which courses to select.

Rhetoric and Writing:

You will be registered for a Rhetoric and Writing course based on your ACT English sub-score and directed self-placement score.

Mathematics:

You will be registered for a Math course based on your chosen major and your highest Math ACT sub-score.

Natural Sciences:

Choose any course/courses you are interested in. To register for a Natural Science course your first semester, you must have a Math ACT sub-score of at least 22.

Fine Arts & Humanities:

  • Historical Understanding Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Literature Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Thoughts, Values, & Beliefs Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Visual and Performing Arts Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Non-Western Culture:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Behavioral & Social Sciences:

Legal Studies requires Econ 1010 or 1020, plus one other course that interests you.  Other concentrations may choose any course/courses that interest you.

Additional Courses for Political Science Majors

Along with your general education courses you will be automatically registered for POLS 1010: American Government.

You will not need to choose this course on the AIQ.

Additional details about this major are available on the departmental website, in the undergraduate catalog, and on the ClearPath for Advising.

Faculty members in the UTC Psychology Department are dedicated teachers who make the educational development of students their top priority. They have created a curriculum that not only helps students to master essential competencies in psychology, but also encourages them to be enthusiastic about learning and to maintain a life-long commitment to personal growth.

At the undergraduate level, a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree gives students a sophisticated grounding in the processes and discoveries of the scientific method as it is used in contemporary Psychology. The attractiveness of these degree programs is apparent in the fact that Psychology is among the most popular majors on campus.  Many of graduates move directly into business or public service.  These graduates have the enhanced opportunities for success that are associated with a strong liberal arts education.  Other majors graduate with a B.S. degree and enter graduate programs in psychology.  They pursue careers in applied psychological areas like Industrial/Organizational, Clinical, and School Psychology or in basic scientific areas like Social, Developmental, and Personality Psychology.  A (B.S) in psychology is also popular with students planning on attending medical school, and health care graduate programs. It offers students the ability to take required prerequisite science courses as well as learn the intricacies of understanding the human mind. 

 

Course Selection for Psychology Majors

Please use the following as a guide to which courses to select.

Rhetoric and Writing:

You will be registered for a Rhetoric and Writing course based on your ACT English sub-score and directed self-placement score.

Mathematics:

You will be registered for a Math course based on your chosen major and your highest Math ACT sub-score. 

Students planning on entering the field of Psychiatry, Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, or medical school are encouraged to take MATH 1130.

Natural Sciences:

Choose any course/courses you are interested in. To register for a Natural Science course your first semester, you must have a Math ACT sub-score of at least 22.

Students planning on entering the field of Psychiatry, Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, or medical school are encouraged to take BIOL 1110/1120: General Biology I & II or CHEM 1110/1120: General Chemistry I & II.

Fine Arts & Humanities:

  • Historical Understanding Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Literature Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Thoughts, Values, & Beliefs Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Visual and Performing Arts Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Non-Western Culture:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Behavioral & Social Sciences:

Choose any course/courses that interest you and is not a Psychology course.

Additional Courses for Psychology Majors

Along with your general education courses you will be automatically registered for PSY 1010: Introduction to Psychology.

You will not need to choose this course on the AIQ.

Additional details about this major are available on the departmental website, in the undergraduate catalog, and on the ClearPath for Advising.

Welcome!  As a new Theatre major at UTC you are automatically a member of the UTC Theatre Company.  Throughout the semester, the department will hold company meetings.  The first company meeting will be held on the first Thursday of the fall semester at 3:00 PM in the Fine Arts Center Studio Theatre (Room 158).  You should attend.  This will also be posted on the Callboard which is outside our Greenroom (Room 118).  

Auditions for both fall shows will occur during the first week of classes.  Yes, we do cast freshmen and non-theatre majors are also occasionally cast.  Watch the Callboard for details.  Rehearsals are in the evenings 7-10:00 M-F, so you will need your evenings clear.

 

Course Selection for Theatre Majors

Please use the following as a guide to which courses to select.

Rhetoric and Writing:

You will be registered for a Rhetoric and Writing course based on your ACT English sub-score and directed self-placement score.

Mathematics:

You will be registered for a Math course based on your chosen major and your highest Math ACT sub-score.

Natural Sciences:

Choose any course/courses you are interested in. To register for a Natural Science course your first semester, you must have a Math ACT sub-score of at least 22.

Fine Arts & Humanities:

  • Historical Understanding Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Literature Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Thoughts, Values, & Beliefs Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Visual and Performing Arts Subcategory: Choose THSP 1110- Introduction to Theatre.

Non-Western Culture:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Behavioral & Social Sciences:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Additional Courses for Theatre Majors

Along with your general education courses you will be automatically registered for three Theatre courses: THSP 1110: Introduction to Theatre, THSP 2010: Movement for Actors, THSP 2000r: Performance and Production, and a Foreign Langauge course.

You will not need to choose these courses on the AIQ.

Additional details about this major are available on the departmental website, in the undergraduate catalog, and on the ClearPath for Advising.

For women in the United States today, it is the best of times and the worst of times. One hundred years ago, only 4% of college-age women were enrolled in some form of higher education; today nearly 60% of that age group attend college. Many more careers are open to women today, yet they still earn 20% less on average than men do, and American women rank 67th in world leadership. For women who work outside the home, finding affordable, high-quality day care and health care for children, adequate maternity leave, and a harassment-free work environment can be difficult.

We need women’s studies now as much as we did in 1970, when the first women’s studies major was established at San Diego State College. UTC’s 30-hour program and 18-hour minor in women’s studies are designed to equip our students to understand problems such as those described above that are rooted deeply in patriarchy, analyze them from the perspective of several disciplines, and develop research-based solutions.

The interdisciplinary women’s studies programs combine courses that explore how power relations are gendered and complicated by issues of race, class and sexual orientation from the disciplinary perspectives of history, literary studies, rhetoric, political science, economics, criminal justice, sociology, anthropology, philosophy, religious studies, psychology, communication, and foreign languages as we teach our students to think analytically, read critically, argue cogently, and speak eloquently about gender-related issues across the disciplines.  The senior seminar that caps the program offers opportunities for leadership training, service learning, and understanding the global dimensions of feminism.

“From the beginning, the goal of women’ s studies was not merely to study women’s position in the world but to change it,” writes Marilyn Jacoby Boxer in When Women Ask the Questions (13). In giving our students the tools to understand and value women’s experiences and achievements as well as to critique existing patriarchal social structures, we aim to equip and empower them to effect such change.

The Learning Outcomes for students majoring in the Women's Studies Program are:

  • Students will be able to explain what patriarchy is and the ways in which it impacts individuals and society.
  •  Students will be able to articulate what gender is and how it is socially constructed.
  • Students will be able to analyze how oppression is intersectional.

For additional information on this program, please see the departmental website.

 

Course Selection for Humanities Majors

Please use the following as a guide to which courses to select.

Rhetoric and Writing:

You will be registered for a Rhetoric and Writing course based on your ACT English sub-score and directed self-placement score.

Mathematics:

You will be registered for a Math course based on your chosen major and your highest Math ACT sub-score.

Natural Sciences:

Choose any course/courses you are interested in.

Fine Arts & Humanities:

  • Historical Understanding Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Literature Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Thoughts, Values, & Beliefs Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Visual and Performing Arts Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Non-Western Culture:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Behavioral & Social Sciences:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

For additional information on this program, please see the departmental website, the undergraduate catalog, or the Clear Path for Advising.


Gary W. Rollins College of Business:

The Gary W. Rollins College of Business offers programs in Accounting, Economics, Entrepreneurship, Finance, General Management, Human Resource Management, Business Analytics, Investments and Marketing.

Choosing your major is often scary and exciting at the same time.  The Gary W. Rollins College of Business provides students with opportunities to explore each of our program areas through course work, advisement, student organizations, or by speaking directly with faculty.  So, whether you are thinking of becoming an accountant, opening your own business or just have a general idea you would like to do something in business, you have plenty of time to find the program that is just right for you!

The key to succeeding as a business major is a strong foundation in fundamental business concepts. This includes topics such as accounting, economics and statistics. To ensure students are well prepared for our program, the Gary W. Rollins College of Business requires all students declaring business as a major to earn a “C” or better in each of the following courses:  ACC 2010, 2020; MGT 1000, 2110, 2120; English 1010/1011, 1020; ECON 1010, 1020.   The College also requires a 2.5 GPA in these nine classes.

Completing your AIQ is an important first step toward entering the Gary W. Rollins College of Business.  While it’s not always apparent how some classes apply to business, serious thought should still be given to each of your responses. After all, your answers will shape your first semester at UTC!

 

Course Selection for Business Majors

Please use the following as a guide to which courses to select.

Rhetoric and Writing

You will be registered for a Rhetoric and Writing course based on your ACT English sub-score and directed self-placement score.

Mathematics:

You will be registered for a Math course based on your chosen major and your highest Math ACT sub-score.

Natural Sciences:

Choose any courses you are interested in. Many Natural Science courses require a Math ACT sub-score of at least 22 or completion of College Algebra or higher.

Fine Arts & Humanities:

  • Historical Understanding Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Literature Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Thoughts, Values, & Beliefs Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Visual and Performing Arts Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Non-Western Culture:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Behavioral & Social Sciences:

Accounting & Finance Majors Choose Between:

  • ANTH 1000: Mysteries of the Human Journey
  • ECON 1010: Principles of Economics: Macro
  • ECON 1020: Principles of Economics: Micro
  • POLS 1010: American Government
  • PSY 1010: Introduction to Psychology
  • SOC 1510: Introduction to Sociology

All Other Business Majors Choose Between:

  • ECON 1010: Principles of Economics: Macro
  • ECON 1020: Principles of Economics: Micro
  • PSY 1010: Introduction to Psychology
  • SOC 1510: Introduction to Sociology

Additional details about this major are available on the departmental website, in the undergraduate catalog, and on the ClearPath for Advising.


College of Engineering and Computer Science:

The College of Engineering and Computer Science provides Bachelor of Science degrees in Computer Science. Computer science and engineering majors take at least a 46-hour sequence of computer science courses and additional courses in an area of concentration. The concentration of study augments the computer science courses and is a specialization in which the student can apply his or her knowledge of computers. Five Computer Science concentrations are available: Software Systems, Computer Engineering, Cyber Security, Data Science, and STEM Education.  

The Computer Science and Engineering program offers five concentrations:

  • Software Systems
  • Computer Engineering
  • Cyber Security
  • Data Science
  • Computer Science: STEM Education (teach 9-12 grades)

 

Course Selection for Computer Science and Engineering Majors

Please use the following as a guide to which courses to select.

Rhetoric and Writing

You will be registered for a Rhetoric and Writing course based on your ACT English sub-score and directed self-placement score.

Mathematics:

You will be registered for a Math course based on your chosen major and your highest Math ACT sub-score.  You may not register for Computer Science 1100 without a 26 Math ACT sub-score or prior completion of college-level Math.  

Natural Sciences:

Choose any course/courses that interest you. Many natural sciences reuire a Math ACT sub-score of at least 22.  

Fine Arts & Humanities:

  • Historical Understanding Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Literature Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Thoughts, Values, & Beliefs Subcategory: CPSC 3610 will be required in a future semester.
  • Visual and Performing Arts Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Non-Western Culture:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Behavioral & Social Sciences:

Choose any course/courses that interest you. Cyber Security requires one course to be CRMJ 1100.

For more information, please visit the departmental website

Additional details about this major are also available in the undergraduate catalog and on the ClearPath for Advising.

Engineering Technology Management (ETM) is an interdisciplinary form of management and engineering involving the application of engineering principles to business practice.

Engineering management is a career that brings together the technological problem-solving savvy of engineers and the organizational, administrative, and planning abilities of managers to oversee complex enterprises from conception to completion.  Potential Careers include product development or project management in manufacturing and service organizations.

There are two programs of study offered:

  • Engineering Technology Management: Engineering Management, B.S.
  • Engineering Technology Management: Construction Management, B.S.

 

Course Selection for Engineering Technology Management Majors

Please use the following as a guide to which courses to select.

Rhetoric and Writing

You will be registered for a Rhetoric and Writing course based on your ACT English sub-score and directed self-placement score.

Mathematics:

You will be registered for a Math course based on your chosen major and your highest Math ACT sub-score.

Natural Sciences:

Choose any courses that interest you. Many Natural Science courses require a Math ACT sub-score of at least 22 or completion of College Algebra or higher.

Fine Arts & Humanities (only two categories required):

  • Historical Understanding Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Literature Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Thoughts, Values, & Beliefs Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Visual and Performing Arts Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Non-Western Culture:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Behavioral & Social Sciences:

You will be required to complete Economics 1010 and 1020 to satisfy your Behavioral and Social Sciences general education. We require a 19 Math ACT sub-score or prior completiong of college-level Math to register for Econ 1010 or 1020.

Additional details about this major are available on the departmental website, in the undergraduate catalog, and on the ClearPath for Advising.

The strengths of UTC's four-year Engineering programs are the emphasis on breadth, interdisciplinary interaction, design, and depth. The programs build on the general education and graduation requirements of the University. Every student completes a structured set of courses that form a foundation in written and oral communication, mathematics, chemistry, physics, and engineering fundamentals. Special emphasis is placed on learning the basic tools and techniques of engineering. Interdisciplinary interaction is introduced and emphasized through interdisciplinary design projects, team experience, and laboratory exercise.

Engineering can be a challenging subject for many students. Predictors of success include:

  1. 4 years of math in high school
  2. A's and B's in high school science courses
  3. A math sub-score on the ACT of 22 or above
  4. A strong work ethic
  5. A high school curriculum that encouraged studying and critical thinking

The Engineering Department offers four programs of study:

  • Chemical Engineering - BSCHE
  • Civil Engineering - BSCE
  • Electrical Engineering - BSEE
  • Mechanical Engineering - BSME

 

Course Selection for Engineering Majors

Please use the following as a guide to which courses to select.

Rhetoric and Writing

You will be registered for a Rhetoric and Writing course based on your ACT English sub-score and directed self-placement score.

Mathematics:

You will be registered for a Math course based on your chosen major and your highest Math ACT sub-score.  If you are at the appropriate Math level (ready for MATH 1950: Calculus I), along with your general education courses you will be registered for additional Engineering courses (Engineering 1030/1030L, for example).

Natural Sciences:

Engineering majors are required to take Chemistry 1110/1110L and Physics 2310/2310L to satisfy their Natural Science general education.  

Fine Arts & Humanities (only two categories required):

  • Historical Understanding Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Literature Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Thoughts, Values, & Beliefs Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Visual and Performing Arts Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Non-Western Culture:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Behavioral & Social Sciences:

Choose any course/courses that interest you. Economics 1010 and 1020 are strongly recommended.

You will not need to choose these courses on the AIQ.

Additional details about this major are available on the departmental website, in the undergraduate catalog, and on the ClearPath for Advising.


College of Health, Education, and Professional Studies:

Teaching is one of the most important professions you can choose. An education major has the opportunity to make a difference in the lives of the next generation. As a future teacher, you may find that you are drawn to working with young children as they learn to read, you may find your calling as a middle grades teacher, or you might decide that you are eager to prepare young people for their futures after high school. In each case, your impact can pave the way for the young people with whom you work.

Education majors at UTC have a number of classes that include field components. These experiences are intended to help candidates identify the grade levels and/or content areas they are most comfortable teaching. As part of these hands-on activities, students may observe in the UTC Children’s Center, participate in the Professional Development School semester, or assist a classroom teacher by tutoring or working with small groups of K-12 students. The four year programs offered by the Professional Education Unit include Elementary K-5, Exceptional Learning K-12 Comprehensive, PreK-3, Middle Grades, Secondary, Exceptional Learning K-8 Interventionalist, and Child and Family Studies.  

We are excited that you are interested in becoming a teacher! As you review the documents and information included in the School of Education website, we hope you will find answers to your questions and will find that our programs reflect our Conceptual Framework and the three areas of Performance, Professionalism, and Partnership.

 

Teaching is one of the most important professions you can choose. An education major has the opportunity to make a difference in the lives of the next generation.  As a future teacher, you may find that you are drawn to working with young children as they learn to read, you may find your calling as a middle grades teacher, or you might decide that you are eager to prepare young people for their futures after high school. In each case, your impact can pave the way for the young people with whom you work.

Education majors at UTC have a number of classes that include field components.  These experiences are intended to help candidates identify the grade levels and/or content areas they are most comfortable teaching. As part of these hands-on activities, students may observe in the UTC Children’s Center, participate in the Professional Development School semester, or assist a classroom teacher by tutoring or working with small groups of K-12 students. The four year programs offered by the Professional Education Unit include Elementary K-5, Exceptional Learning K-12 Comprehensive, PreK-3, Middle Grades, Secondary, Exceptional Learning K-8 Interventionalist, and Child and Family Studies.  

We are excited that you are interested in becoming a teacher! As you review the documents and information included in the School of Education website, we hope you will find answers to your questions and will find that our programs reflect our Conceptual Framework and the three areas of Performance, Professionalism, and Partnership.

 

Course Selection for Exceptional Learning

Please use the following as a guide to which courses to select.

Rhetoric and Writing:

You will be registered for a Rhetoric and Writing course based on your ACT English sub-score and directed self-placement score.

Mathematics:

You will be registered for a Math course based on your chosen major and your highest Math ACT sub-score.

Natural Sciences:

BIOL 1110 and 1110L or ESC 1500 and 1500L; GNSC 1110 and 1110L. To register for a Natural Science course your first semester, you must have a Math ACT sub-score of at least 22.

Fine Arts & Humanities:

  • Historical Understanding Subcategory: Choose one of the following: HIST 1110, HIST 1120, HIST 2010, or HIST 2020.  
  • Literature Subcategory: Choose one of the following: ENGL 1130 or ENGL 1150. 
  • Thoughts, Values, & Beliefs Subcategory: Choose one of the following: ENGL 1130, 1150, HIST 1110, or POLS 1040
  • Visual and Performing Arts Subcategory: Choose one of the following: MUS 1110: Introduction to Music or THSP 1110: Introduction to Theatre. 

Non-Western Culture:

Choose one of the following: HIST 1110, GEOG 1030, ANTH 1200, or POLS 1040

Behavioral & Social Sciences:

POLS 1010: American Government and PSY 1010: Introduction to Psychology are required.

Additional details about this major are available on the departmental website, in the undergraduate catalog, and on the Clear Path for Advising.

As a future professional enrolled in Health and Human Performance (HHP) you will promote active living and empower others to make healthy choices.  Our faculty and staff will work collaboratively with you to ensure that you are prepared to engage the community and enhance our health-related quality of life.  The curriculum includes a combination of lectures, experiential learning, and university/community service to provide both theoretical and practical knowledge of the profession.

Exercise Science prepares students for a variety of fitness and wellness positions in personal training and in community, corporate, and clinical settings. In addition, many students pursue direct entry into exercise science graduate programs.

The program is comprised of a common core curriculum in HHP with directed elective options that can lead to certification with leading fitness organizations, including the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM). Also, students can pursue an internship at the completion of their coursework, which is an outstanding opportunity to gain work experience in a relevant setting.

Graduates of this program are employed in a variety of positions related to the fitness and physical activity fields.

  • Corporate fitness
  • Personal training
  • Nutrition coaches
  • Employee wellness
  • Fitness center management

Students interested in pre-professional programs will complete a rigorous scientific background complimented by courses in nutrition and behavioral science. The primary focus is on disease recognition and prevention, and the unique role exercise plays in both. These students often end up on the following careers:

  • Graduate exercise science
  • Physical therapy school
  • Graduate athletic training
  • Cardiac rehabilitation

For more information visit: www.utc.edu/hhp

 

Course Selection for Exercise Science Majors

Please use the following as a guide to which courses to select.

Rhetoric and Writing:

You will be registered for a Rhetoric and Writing course based on your ACT English sub-score and directed self-placement score.

Mathematics:

You will be registered for a Math course based on your chosen major and your highest Math ACT sub-score.

Natural Sciences:

Exercise Science requires Biology 1110 & Chemistry 1110. To register for a Natural Science course your first semester, you must have a Math ACT sub-score of at least 22.

Fine Arts & Humanities:

  • Historical Understanding Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Literature Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Thought, Values, & Beliefs Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Visual and Performing Arts Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Non-Western Culture:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Behavioral & Social Sciences:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Additional Courses for EXERCISE SCIENCE Majors:

Along with your general education courses you will be automatically registered for HHP 1015: Introduction to Health and Human Performance Professions.

Additional details about this major are available on the departmental website, in the undergraduate catalog, and on the ClearPath for Advising.

As a future professional enrolled in Health and Human Performance (HHP) you will promote active living and empower others to make healthy choices. Our faculty and staff will work collaboratively with you to ensure that you are prepared to engage the community and enhance our health-related quality of life. The curriculum includes a combination of lectures, experiential learning, and university/community service to provide both theoretical and practical knowledge of the profession.

This career program prepares students who desire teacher licensure and endorsement in physical education and health instruction (K-12). Since graduates of this program can be certified to coach, a partial segment of the concentration is devoted to content and laboratory courses designed to ensure necessary skills for both teaching and coaching.

Graduates of this concentration often look to secure full-time positions as K-12 physical education or health teachers, while some seek entry directly into graduate studies.

Students pursuing this degree concentration will also need to seek admission into the Teacher Education Program (TEP), administered through the School of Education (http://www.utc.edu/Academic/SchoolOfEducation/TEPCHECKpoints.php).

Along with TEP admission standards HHP students will be expected to maintain a minimum grade point average of 2.5 in professional health and human performance course work and successfully interview with the TEP/HHP committee. Students enrolled within any teacher licensure concentration are expected to maintain and demonstrate standards of ethics reasonably attributed to an educator who holds professional teacher certification. Additionally, students who plan to teach outside the state of Tennessee are strongly urged to check the certification requirements of the state with the appropriate state department of education before the end of their sophomore year in order to plan an appropriate academic program.

 

Course Selection For HHP Health and Physical Education K-12 MAJOR

When you get to the course selection portion (AIQ) of the orientation application please use the following as a guide to which courses to select.

Rhetoric and Writing:

You will be registered for a Rhetoric and Writing course (English) based on your ACT English sub-score and Directed Self Placement score. If you have AP Language or Dual Enrollment credit for English 1010 and/or English 1020 please make sure you have indicated the course you have taken in the AP/Dual Enrollment section of the AIQ.

Mathematics:

You will be registered for a Math course based on your chosen major and your highest Math ACT sub-score.

Natural Sciences:

Choose any course/courses you are interested in. To register for a Natural Science course your first semester, you must have a Math ACT sub-score of at least 22.

Fine Arts & Humanities:

Historical Understanding Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.

  • Literature Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Thoughts, Values, & Beliefs Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Visual and Performing Arts Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Non-Western Culture:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Behavioral & Social Sciences:

Choose any two classes that interest you. 

Additional Courses for Pedagogy K-12 Majors

Along with your general education courses you may be registered for HHP 0021: Concepts and Application in Wellness/Physical Education. You will not need to choose these courses on the AIQ.

Additional details about this major are available on the departmental website, in the undergraduate catalog, and on the ClearPath for Advising.

As a future professional in Health and Human Performance (HHP) you will promote active living and empower others to make healthy choices. Our faculty and staff will work collaboratively with you to ensure that you are prepared to engage the community and enhance our health-related quality of life. The curriculum includes a combination of lectures, experiential learning, and university/community service to provide both theoretical and practical knowledge of the profession.

The professional disciplines that comprise Sport and Tourism Management (SORT) prepare students for management and leadership positions in many commercial and non-profit settings. We recognize the complex relationship between sport and society, and allow students to select an emphasis in Sport Administration, Tourism Management, or Outdoor Recreation. A common core of courses in HHP and Business serve as the foundation, upon which each specialization can build.

Sport Administration:

Students studying sport administration will gain insight and experience into the sports and recreation profession on and off UTC’s campus. These students enjoy the culture of sports, recreation, and fitness and often end up on the following careers: K-12 or college athletic directors, K-12 or college coaches, Personal trainers, Community recreation directors, Facility managers, Special event coordinators, and Camp directors.

Outdoor Recreation:

Students in the outdoor recreation program are passionate about the outdoors and want others to recognize the benefits of connecting with the natural environment. There is perhaps no better place to experience the outdoors than in Outside Magazine’s #1 outdoor city in America: Chattanooga, TN. An outdoor recreation degree may lead to careers in: Camp management, Adventure tourism (e.g. Outdoor Chattanooga), Outdoor leadership, Wilderness therapy, Facility management, K-12 and college outdoor programs, and Parks management (e.g. Park ranger).

Tourism Management:

“Tourism Management” is the traditional definition for all activities outside of work and school. Students entering this specialization are “generalists” who will find careers helping others make positive use of non-work time. These careers may be found in: Community recreation centers, Commercial tourism, Museums and cultural centers (e.g. Children’s museum), After-school programs, and Co-curricular programs in K-12 and colleges.

 

Course Selection For Sport, Outdoor Recreation, and Tourism Management Majors

When you get to the course selection portion (AIQ) of the orientation application please use the following as a guide to which courses to select.

Rhetoric and Writing:

You will be registered for a Rhetoric and Writing course (English) based on your ACT English sub-score and Directed Self Placement score. If you have AP Language or Dual Enrollment credit for English 1010 and/or English 1020 please make sure you have indicated the course you have taken in the AP/Dual Enrollment section of the AIQ.

Mathematics:

You will be registered for a Math course based on your chosen major and your highest Math ACT sub-score.

Natural Sciences:

Choose any course/courses you are interested in.

Fine Arts & Humanities:

  • Historical Understanding Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Literature Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Thoughts, Values, & Beliefs Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Visual and Performing Arts Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Non-Western Culture:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Behavioral & Social Sciences:

Economics 1020 is required. Please choose any additional course/courses you are interested in.

Additional Courses for SORT majors

Along with your general education courses you will automatically be registered for HHP 1015: Introduction to Health and Human Performance Professions. 

Additional details about this major are available on the departmental website, in the undergraduate catalog, and on the ClearPath for Advising.

The BIS degree helps UTC to further meet the educational needs of our diverse community by allowing students to build a personalized program of study focused on a theme that integrates two or more disciplines. The degree program attracts individuals who have previously earned credit hours and wish to complete a degree as well as individuals whose educational goals are not met by traditional degree offerings.

Essential Elements of a BIS curricular plan include (1) integrated, interdisciplinary program of study focused on a theme and related disciplines, tailored to specific student goals, (2) two or more disciplines, and (3) a capstone experience portfolio, which includes reflective essays and self-assessment demonstrating integration of the multiple disciplines.

You can read more about the major at http://www.utc.edu/BIS. Please follow the link on the Integrated Studies homepage to “Click to get started today” to view a video about the program. Freshmen who choose this major will be advised by the Center for Advisement.

Please be sure to list your areas of interest in the comment section of the AIQ as this will help determine which classes you are registered to take in the fall.

 

Course Selection for Integrated Studies Majors

Please use the following as a guide to which courses to select.

Rhetoric and Writing:

You will be registered for a Rhetoric and Writing course based on your ACT English sub-score and directed self-placement score.

Mathematics:

You will be registered for a Math course based on your chosen major and your highest Math ACT sub-score.

Natural Sciences:

Choose any course/courses you are interested in. To register for a Natural Science course your first semester, you must have a Math ACT sub-score of at least 22.

Fine Arts & Humanities:

  • Historical Understanding Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Literature Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Thoughts, Values, & Beliefs Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Visual and Performing Arts Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Non-Western Culture:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Behavioral & Social Sciences:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Additional Courses for Integrated Studies Majors

Along with your general education courses you will possibly be registered for one or more classes toward your interests.

You will not need to choose these courses on the AIQ.

Additional details about this major are available on the departmental website, in the undergraduate catalog, and on the ClearPath for Advising.

Welcome to The Department of Interior Design 

A degree in Interior Architecture prepares students to become professional interior designers. A professional interior designer enhances the function and quality of interior spaces for the purpose of improving quality of life, increasing productivity and protecting the health, safety & welfare of the user. 

This requires having a(n):

  • Global perspective and knowledge of sustainability.
  • Understanding of human behavior and psychology.
  • Knowledge of codes and regulations.
  • Knowledge of interior construction, building systems and materials.
  • Ability to communicate and collaborate.
  • Understanding of business practices and ethics.

 

Course Selection for Interior Architecture Majors

Please use the following as a guide to which courses to select.

Rhetoric and Writing:

You will be registered for a Rhetoric and Writing course based on your ACT English sub-score and directed self-placement score.

Mathematics:

You will be registered for a Math course based on your chosen major and your highest Math ACT sub-score.

Natural Sciences:

Choose any course/courses you are interested in. To register for a Natural Science course your first semester, you must have a Math ACT sub-score of at least 22.

Fine Arts & Humanities:

  • Historical Understanding Subcategory: IARC 1200 recommended for this category.
  • Literature Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Thoughts, Values, & Beliefs Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Visual and Performing Arts Subcategory: Choose one from the following: ART 1110- Introduction to Art, ART 2140- The History of Western Art from Prehistoric to medieval, ART 2150- The History of Western Art from the Renaissance to the Present.

Non-Western Culture:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Behavioral & Social Sciences:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Additional Courses for Interior Architecture Majors

Along with your general education courses you will be automatically registered for IARC 1000: Design Fundamentals and IARC 1050: Volume, Space, Form.

You will not need to choose these courses on the AIQ.

Additional details about this major are available on the departmental website, in the undergraduate catalog, and on the ClearPath for Advising.

Teaching is one of the most important professions you can choose. An education major has the opportunity to make a difference in the lives of the next generation.  As a future teacher, you may find that you are drawn to working with young children as they learn to read, you may find your calling as a middle grades teacher, or you might decide that you are eager to prepare young people for their futures after high school. In each case, your impact can pave the way for the young people with whom you work.

Education majors at UTC have a number of classes that include field components.  These experiences are intended to help candidates identify the grade levels and/or content areas they are most comfortable teaching. As part of these hands-on activities, students may observe in the UTC Children’s Center, participate in the Professional Development School semester, or assist a classroom teacher by tutoring or working with small groups of K-12 students. The four year programs offered by the Professional Education Unit include Elementary K-5, Exceptional Learning K-12 Comprehensive, PreK-3, Middle Grades, Secondary, and Exceptional Learning K-12.

We are excited that you are interested in becoming a teacher! As you review the documents and information included in the School of Education website, we hope you will find answers to your questions and will find that our programs reflect our Conceptual Framework and the three areas of Performance, Professionalism, and Partnership.

 

Course Selection for Middle Grades Education Majors

Please use the following as a guide to which courses to select.

Rhetoric and Writing:

You will be registered for a Rhetoric and Writing course based on your ACT English sub-score and directed self-placement score.

Mathematics:

You will be registered for a Math course based on your chosen major and your highest Math ACT sub-score.

Natural Sciences:

Choose any course/courses you are interested in. To register for a Natural Science course your first semester, you must have a Math ACT sub-score of at least 22.

Natural Sciences, Fine Arts & Humanities, Non-Western, and Behavioral & Social Sciences:

Concentrations have different requirements.  Please see the Clear Path associated with the concentration you are interested in.

Additional details about this major are available on the departmental website and in the undergraduate catalog.

Please note that meeting the minimum criteria for admission into the School of Nursing does not guarantee admission into the School of Nursing.  Enrollment in the nursing major is limited and the number of qualified applicants exceeds the number of students that can be admitted.   You will have an opportunity to apply to the School of Nursing your sophomore year.

For more information please visit www.utc.edu/nursing

 

Course Selection for Nursing Majors

Please use the following as a guide to which courses to select.

Rhetoric and Writing:

You will be registered for a Rhetoric and Writing course based on your ACT English sub-score and directed self-placement score.

Mathematics:

You will be registered for a Math course based on your chosen major and your highest Math ACT sub-score.

Natural Sciences:

Choose CHEM 1110. To register for a Natural Science course your first semester, you must have a Math ACT sub-score of at least 22.

Fine Arts & Humanities:

  • Historical Understanding Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Literature Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Thoughts, Values, & Beliefs Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Visual and Performing Arts Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Non-Western Culture:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Behavioral & Social Sciences:

PSY 1010; plus one additional course within this category.  Additional course cannot be a Psychology course. 

Additional Courses for Nursing Majors

Along with your general education courses you will be automatically registered for CHEM 1110: General Chemistry I (if you have a Math ACT subscore of 22 or higher) or PSY 1010: Introduction to Psychology.

Additional details about this major are available on the departmental website, in the undergraduate catalog, and on the ClearPath for Advising.

Teaching is one of the most important professions you can choose. An education major has the opportunity to make a difference in the lives of the next generation.  As a future teacher, you may find that you are drawn to working with young children as they learn to read, you may find your calling as a middle grades teacher, or you might decide that you are eager to prepare young people for their futures after high school. In each case, your impact can pave the way for the young people with whom you work.

Education majors at UTC have a number of classes that include field components.  These experiences are intended to help candidates identify the grade levels and/or content areas they are most comfortable teaching. As part of these hands-on activities, students may observe in the UTC Children’s Center, participate in the Professional Development School semester, or assist a classroom teacher by tutoring or working with small groups of K-12 students. The four year programs offered by the Professional Education Unit include Elementary K-5, Exceptional Learning K-12 Comprehensive, PreK-3, Middle Grades, Secondary, and Exceptional Learning K-12.

We are excited that you are interested in becoming a teacher! As you review the documents and information included in the School of Education website, we hope you will find answers to your questions and will find that our programs reflect our Conceptual Framework and the three areas of Performance, Professionalism, and Partnership

*Students interested in teaching science or math at the secondary level should major should major in the appropriate science major with a STEM Education concentration. More information is available online.

 

Course Selection for Secondary Education Majors

Please use the following as a guide to which courses to select.

Rhetoric and Writing:

You will be registered for a Rhetoric and Writing course based on your ACT English sub-score and directed self-placement score.

Mathematics:

You will be registered for a Math course based on your chosen major and your highest Math ACT sub-score.

Natural Sciences, Fine Arts & Humanities, Non-Western, and Behavioral & Social Sciences:

Concentrations have different requirements.  Please see the Clear Path associated with the concentration you are interested in.

Additional details about this major are available on the departmental website and in the undergraduate catalog.

Welcome, we are excited that you are considering social work as your major. Social work is one of the fastest growing professions in the United States. Among the settings that employ social workers are schools, hospitals, mental health clinics, private counseling services, drug and alcohol clinics, job training programs, adult and child social services, in-home services, social welfare agencies, adult corrections and juvenile probation. The mission of the Baccalaureate Social Work (BSW) degree program at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga is to prepare students for competent, generalist evidence-based practice. As generalists, you will learn a common body of social work knowledge, values, and skills transferable among human service settings and population groups—making you ready for employment as soon as you graduate.

 

Course Selection for Social Work Majors

Please use the following as a guide to which courses to select.

Rhetoric and Writing:

You will be registered for a Rhetoric and Writing course based on your ACT English sub-score and directed self-placement score.

Mathematics:

You will be registered for a Math course based on your chosen major and your highest Math ACT sub-score.

Natural Sciences:

Choose any course/courses you are interested in. To register for a Natural Science course your first semester, you must have a Math ACT sub-score of at least 22.

Fine Arts & Humanities:

  • Historical Understanding Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Literature Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Thoughts, Values, & Beliefs Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Visual and Performing Arts Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Non-Western Culture:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Behavioral & Social Sciences:

Choose PSY 1010: Introduction to Psychology and SOC 1510: Introduction to Sociology.

Additional Courses for Social Work Majors
Along with your general education courses you will be automatically registered for one of the following Social Work courses:

  • SOCW 1100: Introduction to the Social Work Experience
  • SOCW 2050: Introduction to Social Policy: A Child and Family Perspective
  • SOCW 2070: Interviewing Skills

You will not need to choose this course on the AIQ.

Additional details about this major are available on the departmental website, in the undergraduate catalog, and on the ClearPath for Advising.


No College Designated (Undecided Students):

WHAT’S your major? It’s the defining question for college students – and the cliché’ that’s launched a thousand friendships and romances. It’s also a question that has become harder for students to answer. Many students enter college undecided about their major. Many students who enter college as undecided students worry about being undecided. Some students may be unwilling, unable, or unready to make a choice of an area of study at the point when they enter college. Others may declare a major early on, only to discover different options as they encounter new courses and experiences.

There’s no substitute for the power of discovery. Here’s a secret. Loads of brilliant students don’t know what they want to major in. And that’s ok. So you’re not sure of your major, you are not alone! 25-50 percent of students entering college are unsure of their major, and about 75 percent of college students will change their major at least once and others two or three times.

As an undecided student, your exploration into your course selection will be an easy and exciting one. Decide on classes based on your strengths, interest and skills. You’ll have plenty of time throughout your first year to explore individualized academic and career planning to ensure a smooth transition into your major.

Take your time and ask yourself. What are my passions, my dreams, my talents and my interest? Review the following six (6) different exploratory options offered here at UTC. After reviewing the following tracks decide the best direction for YOU! Making a thoughtful selection here will help as we place you in General Education courses for your first semester.

Exploratory is the new undecided. Let’s spend this semester exploring the many options available at UTC. Your careful selection of General Education courses will give you an active role in your academic choices. We are eager to help you EXPLORE, DISCOVER & DECLARE your major. 

Below are the six (6) Exploratory Tracks here at UTC. Carefully look through them all to see where you best fit. If you are strongly leaning towards a particular major, please fill out the AIQ for that major.

 

The Exploratory Behavioral & Social Sciences track is for students who are interested in majors related to behavioral and social science professions but not quite ready to declare. As an Exploratory student, you will mainly take classes towards satisfying the General Education requirements while exploring potential majors.  Please note, that while courses are listed under General Education, many majors require certain courses from the General Education options.

Associated Behavioral & Social Science majors include the following: Anthropology, Political Science, Criminal Justice, Psychology, Social Work, and Sociology.

 

The Exploratory Business track is for students who are interested in majors related to business professions but not quite ready to declare. As an Exploratory student, you will mainly take classes towards satisfying the General Education requirements while exploring potential majors.  Please note, that while courses are listed under General Education, many majors require certain courses from the General Education options.

Associated Business majors include the following: Accounting, Human Resources Management, Economics, Entrepreneurship, Business Analytics, Finance, Investments, Management, and Marketing.

 

The Exploratory Education track is for students who are interested in majors related to education professions but not quite ready to declare. As an Exploratory student, you will mainly take classes towards satisfying the General Education requirements while exploring potential majors.  Please note, that while courses are listed under General Education, many majors require certain courses from the General Education options.

Associated Education majors include the following: Family and Child Studies, Middle Grades Education, Elementary Education, Early Childhood Education, Secondary Education, STEM Education, and Exceptional Learning.

 

The Exploratory Life, Health, and Physical Sciences track is for students who are interested in majors related to health and life science professions but not quite ready to declare. As an Exploratory student, you will mainly take classes towards satisfying the General Education requirements while exploring potential majors.  Please note, that while courses are listed under General Education, many majors require certain courses from the General Education options.

Associated Life, Health, and Physical Sciences majors include the following: Biology, Nursing, Exercise Science, Health & Physical Education, Sports and Tourism Management, Chemistry, Physics, Geology, and Environmental Science.  

 

The Exploratory Liberal Arts, Humanities, and Interior Architecture track is for students who are interested in majors related to these disciplines but not quite ready to declare. As an Exploratory student, you will mainly take classes towards satisfying the General Education requirements while exploring potential majors.  Please note, that while courses are listed under General Education, many majors require certain courses from the General Education options.  Students interested in this track should be aware these majors require four semester of foreign language.  

Associated Liberal Arts, Humanities, & Interior Architecture majors include the following: Art, Interior Architecture, Communication, International Studies, English, Music, Foreign Language, Philosophy, History, Religion, Humanities, and Theatre. 

 

The Exploratory Math, Engineering, and Computer Science track is for students who are interested in majors related to these disciplines but not quite ready to declare. As an Exploratory student, you will mainly take classes towards satisfying the General Education requirements while exploring potential majors.  Please note, that while courses are listed under General Education, many majors require certain courses from the General Education options.

Associated Math, Engineering, & Computer Science majors include the following:  Computer Science, Engineering, Mathematics, and Technology Management.

 

Course Selection For Exploratory Majors

When you get to the course selection portion (AIQ) of the orientation application please use the following as a guide to which courses to select.

Rhetoric and Writing:

You will be registered for a Rhetoric and Writing course (English) based on your ACT English sub-score and Directed Self Placement score.  If you have AP Language or Dual Enrollment credit for English 1010 and/or English 1020 please make sure you have indicated the course you have taken in the AP/Dual Enrollment section of the AIQ. 

Mathematics:

You will be registered for a Math course based your highest Math ACT sub-score. Math placement is also decided based on our expected exploratory major track (i.e. if you are interested in the Liberal Arts or Behavioral Science you could be placed in Math 1010, but if your interest is directed to the Health Sciences, Engineering, or Business, then Math 1130 may be the best choice for you).

Natural Sciences:

Choose any course/courses you are interested in. To register for a Natural Science course your first semester, you must have a Math ACT sub-score of at least 22. Some natural science courses have associated lab sections and these courses will be 4-credit hours (i.e. Chemistry, Biology or Environmental Science). Others will only be 3-credit hours (i.e. Oceanography or Science and Society).

Fine Arts & Humanities:

  • Historical Understanding Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Literature Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Thoughts, Values, & Beliefs Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.
  • Visual and Performing Arts Subcategory: Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Non-Western Culture:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

Behavioral & Social Sciences:

Choose any course/courses that interest you.

*In the additional comments section of the AIQ, please list majors/areas/careers that interest you. This information will determine certain courses that you are registered for. Please be as detailed as possible (ex. Political Science. I want to be a lawyer).

Additional details about all of our majors are available on departmental websites, in the undergraduate catalog, and on the Clear Path for Advising.