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Instructional Excellence Retreats

An Instructional Excellence Retreat is held every May on UTC's campus.  This professional development program provides opportunities for faculty and staff to network while learning about teaching and learning topics in-depth from fellow faculty and an external workshop speaker.  Information about the 2013 Retreat is below:

 

UTC Instructional Excellence Retreat

May 2nd and May 3rd, 2013

University Center

                                                                                                                              
Thursday, May 2nd
ThinkAchieve Faculty Fellows WorkshopsProblem-based learning in the morning (8:30-10:00 AM) and Pop culture in the classroom in the afternoon  (1:00-2:30 PM), UC Ocoee Room, limited to 20 participants each.
Teaching    and Learning Seminars – 1:00-4:45 PM , UC Raccoon Mountain Room and    Lookout Mountain Room; Concurrent sessions; registration not required.  For the schedule, click here
Reception at Mayor’s Mansion  - 5:30-7:30 PM. Welcome reception for May 3rd workshop speaker,    Dr. Patti Clayton
Friday, May 3rd
Workshop by Dr. Patti Clayton - Cultivating Critical Thinking through Critical Reflection on    Experience Within and Beyond the Classroom 8:30 AM-4:30 PM, UC Tennessee Room
ThinkAchieve Poster  Session  - UC Tennessee Room            
Posters will be presented by ThinkAchieve grant recipients.  Posters available for viewing all day.
 
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Detailed Itinerary

Thursday, May 2nd


ThinkAchieve Faculty Fellows Workshops – Ocoee Room
  • Workshop 1:  Cheryl  Robinson – Problem-based learning
     Thursday, May 2nd, 8:30-10:00 AM, Ocoee Room
Problem-based learning is an instructional approach by which  student learning centers on a multi-level problem that cannot be answered with  a single correct answer. Much of the literature in regards to problem-based  learning suggests that by having students learn through the experience of  problem-solving, both content and thinking strategies are learned. In this  workshop, faculty will be introduced to 8 instructional principles of  problem-based learning. Registration  RequiredLimited to 20 participants.
  • Workshop 2:  Ralph  Covino – Pop Culture in the Classroom
     Thursday, May 2nd, 1:00-2:30 PM, Ocoee Room
Scholarly attention has focused on millennial students’ resistance  to ‘old school’ lecture formats, their technology-dependence, and what happens  when they get to college; however, a key aspect of the way these students  actually process information in their out-of-class lives -and how it can be  used in-class- has yet to receive much notice. Many on the teaching front-lines  have noted how students react positively to in-class references to film,  television, and other media such as The  Hunger Games, 50  Shades of Gray, superhero films, and the like; but how can we best  harness our students’ ‘referential culture’ to promote logical and coherent  critical thinkers? Participants in this workshop will be introduced to best  practices for the use of popular culture in the classroom.  Registration  Required.   Limited to 20 participants.
 
Teaching and Learning Seminars (concurrent sessions)
Thursday, May 2nd, 1:00-4:45 PM, Lookout Mountain Room (session A) and Raccoon Mountain Room (session B)
Hear from and interact with UTC faculty and staff as they share their expertise in teaching and learning strategies.  Presentations will be on the hour.  We are delighted to have the each of the three ThinkAchieve Faculty Award winners presenting.  No registration is required for these seminars.  Click here to see the seminar schedule
Speaker Reception at Mayor’s Mansion
Thursday, May 2nd, 5:30-7:30 pm
Join us at the Mayor’s Mansion for a  reception to welcome our workshop speaker, Dr. Patti Clayton.  Food, beverages, and conversation will be  provided. 

 

Friday, May 3rd 

Cultivating Critical Thinking through  Critical Reflection on Experience Within and Beyond the Classroom, Dr. Patti Clayton
 Friday, May 3rd, 8:30 AM-4:30 PM, Tennessee Room
 
UTC's QEP focuses on critical thinking in a comprehensive  way that includes student orientation activities, curricular integration, and  experiential learning opportunities (both within and beyond the classroom).  This session focuses particularly on experiential learning, although the  content is broadly applicable across any instructional context.      As the part of the process that generates, deepens, and  documents learning, critical reflection is key to all forms of experiential  learning. It is also a counter-normative way for many of us to teach and to  learn, so it is both challenging to undertake and potentially transformative. 

 

In this highly interactive full-day workshop, participants will:
a) undertake  experiential learning opportunities (reflection prompts will be sent in advance  of the session),
b) consider the meaning and role of critical reflection in  experiential learning,
c) apply models for experiential learning and for  integrated design to their own instructional contexts,
d) critique example  reflection activities, and
e) practice developing critical reflection prompts  and applying rubrics to student products.
Participants will leave the session  with examples of critical reflection activities and with resources that can be  used with our students and in our own instructional design and assessment work.
 
Registration  requiredLunch and refreshments provided. 
 
If you require accomodations for this event, please contact the Walker Center for Teaching and Learning at 425-4188 prior to the event.  You can also contact the Office for Students with Disabilities at 425-4006 (V/TTY) or osd@utc.edu.
Cultivating Critical Thinking through  Critical Reflection on Experience Within and Beyond the Classroom, Dr. Patti Clayton
 Friday, May 3rd, 8:30 AM-4:30 PM, Tennessee Room
 
UTC's QEP focuses on critical thinking in a comprehensive  way that includes student orientation activities, curricular integration, and  experiential learning opportunities (both within and beyond the classroom).  This session focuses particularly on experiential learning, although the  content is broadly applicable across any instructional context.     
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