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Dr. Amanda Clark
Assistant Professor, Member of Graduate Faculty
Psychology
Ph.D., University of Waterloo, Ontario, 2010
  Amanda-Clark@utc.edu
  423-425-5851
  423-425-4284
  350-H Holt Hall

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Degrees

Post Doctoral Fellowship – Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest Center for Geriatric Care, 2010-2012

Ph.D,, Psychology - Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience, University of Waterloo - Waterloo, Ontario, 2007-2010

M.A., Psychology - Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience, University of Waterloo - Waterloo, Ontario, 2005-2007
B.A., Honours in Psychology with Distinction, St. Thomas University – Fredericton, New Brunswick, 2001-2005

Teaching Interests

Introduction to Psychology

Psychology of Aging

Physiological Psychology

Advanced seminar in Psychological Processes

Research Interests

Attention-related errors in routine tasks

Changes in attention as a function of aging

Executive dysfunction in brain injury

Recent Publications

 * indicates a student that has worked under my supervision.

Clark, A., Parakh, R., Smilek, D. & Roy, E. (2011). The Slip Induction Task: Creating a window into attention failures. Behavior Research Methods. DOI: 10.3758/s13428-011-0154-0.

Dawson, D., Richardson, J., Troyer, A., Binns, M., Clark, A., Winocur, G., Hunt, A., Bar, Y., Polatajko, H. & Schweizer, T. (in press). An occupation-based strategy training approach to managing age-related executive changes: A pilot randomized controlled trial. Clinical Rehabilitation.

Clark, A., Rose, R. & Roy, E. (submitted). Older and wiser? The impact of age and task pace on slips of action.  Canadian Journal on Aging.

*Burns, C., *VanRuymbeke, N., Clark, A., & Dawson, D. (in preparation). Oops – that was a mistake! Improving performance of routine tasks. Neuropsychological Rehabilation.

Clark, A., Hendrickson, J., Ozen, L., & Roy, E. (manuscript in preparation). Detecting persistent memory and attention deficits in high functioning young adults with mild head injury. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.

Ozen, L., Clark, A., Roy, E. & Fernandes, M. (manuscript in preparation). Measuring attention deficits in younger and older adults with traumatic brain injury. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society.

Clark A., Lyons, J. & Roy, E. (manuscript in preparation). The role of task goals in generating action slips within the Slip Induction Task. Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology.

Clark, A., Dawson, D. (manuscript in preparation). Assessing changes in strategy use following a meta-cognitive strategy training intervention in older adults. Destination journal has not yet been selected.

*Rose, R., Clark, A., Gonzales, D. & Roy, E. (manuscript in preparation). Still making attentional errors: A modified Slip Induction Task. Destination journal has not yet been selected.
Abstracts Published in Peer-Reviewed Journals

*Burns, C., *VanRuymbeke, N., Clark, A., & Dawson, D. (2012). Oops – that was a mistake! Improving performance of routine tasks. Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy. Presented as a poster at the 2012 meeting of the Canadian Association of Occupational Therapy.

Clark, A., Roy, E., & Dawson, D. (2012). Characterizing the impact of executive dysfunction on everyday life in adults with stroke? Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society. Presented as a poster at the 2012 meeting of the International Neuropsychological Society in Montreal, QC.

Clark, A., Ozen, L., Fernandes, M. & Roy. E. (2011). Preventing slips of action: Evidence from younger and older adults with mild traumatic brain injury. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Presented as a poster at the ACRM-ASNR 2011 Annual Conference, Atlanta, GA.

 

 

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