Current Courses

 

A complete list of history courses with descriptions can be found here.

The full class schedule can be found here.

Courses with an *asterisk* also satisfy General Education requirements.

The courses for Fall 2016 are listed below with instructors and section numbers.  More information on the four-level curriculum structure can be found here.

The courses for Spring 2017 follow those for Fall 2016.

 


Fall 2016

Level 1 – Introducing History

HIST 1110 – World History from Origins to 1400 *

Ruby Choudhury (00, 01, 05)

James Guilfoyle (02, 03, 06, 07)

Boris Gorshkov (04)      

HIST 1120 – World History from 1400-Present *

Fang Yu Hu (00, 01)

Ryan Edwards (02, 03)

Annie Tracy Samuel (04, 05)

Seth Epstein (06, 07)

Amy Huseman (08, 10, 14)

Amanda Shaw (09)

Boris Gorshkov (11, 12, 13)

HIST 2010 – United States to 1865 *

Michael Thompson (00)

HIST 2020 – United States since 1865 *

Stephen Edwin Taylor (00)

Susan Eckelmann (01, 02)

Seth Epstein (03, 04)

 

Level 2 – Exploring History

HIST 2030 – History of Tennessee *

David Lee (00)

HIST 2100 – Rhetoric and Writing in History *

James Guilfoyle (00)

Michelle White (01)

HIST 2210 – Medieval Europe: c. 300-1500 *

Kira Robison (00, 01)

HIST 2440 – Gilded Age to Jazz Age *

William Kuby (00, 01)

 

Level 3 – Interpreting History

HIST 3210 – Reformation Europe and the World

Boris Gorshkov (00)

HIST 3270 – Under Hitler’s Shadow: Europe 1929-1945

John Swanson (00)

HIST 3300 – History of England

Michelle White (00)

HIST 3820 – United States and the Middle East

Annie Tracy Samuel (00)

HIST 3920 – The U.S. and the Cold War

Susan Eckelmann (00)

HIST 3920 – U.S. and Asia

Norton Wheeler (01)

HIST 3940 – Latin America: Environment and Extraction

Ryan Edwards (00)

 

Level 4 – Engaging History

HIST 4020 – The Historian’s Craft: Seminars in History

Kira Robison (00)

HIST 4500 – Gender and Sexuality in Modern East Asia

Fang Yu Hu (00)

HIST 4500 – Modern Ireland

James Guilfoyle (01)

HIST 4920 – Internships in History

Michael Thompson (00)

HIST 4995 – Departmental Thesis

William Kuby (00)

 

 

Spring 2017

Courses by Level

Courses by Subject/Region

General Education Courses

 

Courses by Level

Introductory Courses

This course will introduce students to human achievements in Eurasia, Africa, and the Americas from the origins of civilization to about the year 1400. Rather than taking a strictly chronological approach to civilizations and cultures, it will emphasize emerging cultures, traditions, and religions both as expressions of their time and place and as meaningful in our modern world.

27717 / James Guilfoyle / TR 8:00-9:15

27718James Guilfoyle / TR 10:50-12:05

27719 / Ruby Choudhury / MWF 8:00-8:50

27720 / Boris Gorshkov / MWF 10:00-10:50

27721Boris Gorshkov / MWF 11:00-11:50

27722 / Kira Robison / MWF 11:00-11:50

27749 / Jeffrey Seagle / Internet

27750 / Jeffrey Seagle / Internet

This course will focus on the evolution of multiple, autonomous cultural centers within Africa, Eurasia, and the Americas prior to 1400 to an interconnected global system in the present. Topics covered include exploration, colonialism, responses to industrialization, the spread of the nation-state, the rise of modern science, the impact of a global economy, ethnicity and nationalism, migration, and mass culture.

27751 / Amy Huesman / Hybrid

27752Boris Gorshkov / Internet

27753Boris Gorshkov / Internet

27723 / Ryan Edwards / TR 12:15-1:30

27724Ryan Edwards / TR 1:40-2:55

27725 / Fang Yu Hu / TR 8:00-9:15

27726Fang Yu Hu / TR 9:25-10:40

27727 / Amanda Shaw / W 5:30-8:00

27728 / Annie Tracy Samuel / MWF 10:00-10:50

27729Annie Tracy Samuel / MWF 11:00-11:50

A survey of American History from the age of discovery to the present, with special attention to the peoples, ideas, and cultures that created the United States.

23191 / Stephen Taylor / MWF 8:00-8:50

27730 / TBA / TR 12:15-1:30

20656 / TBA / TR 10:50-12:05

A survey of American History from the age of discovery to the present, with special attention to the peoples, ideas, and cultures that created the United States.

27731 / Seth Epstein / MWF 9:00-9:50

27754 / TBA / Internet

24474 / Susan Eckelmann Berghel / TR 9:25-10:40

24475Susan Eckelmann Berghel / TR 10:50-12:05

25484Seth Epstein / MWF 1:00-1:50

27116 / TBA / Internet

27117Seth Epstein / Internet


2000-Level Courses

A study of the political, economic, social, and cultural development of the state from the days of the Indians to the present.

27732 / David Lee / R 5:30-8:00

Introduction to principles and practices of historical research and writing. Emphasizes research methods and techniques, analysis of source material, construction of historical arguments, and effective written presentation of material in multiple contexts.

27733 / Michelle White / TR 9:25-10:40

27734Michelle White / TR 10:50-12:05

This class looks at the processes, institutions, and relationships that “made” modern Europe. Special attention will paid to religious, political, economic, and social development in this period of contradiction and intellectual tumult. Topics covered will include artistic, scientific, and religious movements; imperialism and exploration; Absolutism; Constitutionalism, and the Enlightenment.

27735Michelle White / TR 3:05-4:20

This course surveys important themes and developments of European history from the beginning of the French Revolution to approximately the turn of the  twenty-first century. Topics covered may include the balance of power in Europe and international relations; the rise of imperialism; the spread of industrial society; the problems of world wars and reconstruction; the decline of European colonial systems, and the diplomacy of the Cold War.

27736Boris Gorshkov / MWF 1:00-1:50


3000-Level Courses

An exploration of the rise of humanism in fourteenth-century Italy and the spread of humanistic ideas into greater Europe and the responses to it throughout high culture, religion, government, the sciences, and expansion abroad to ca. 1600.

27737Amy Huesman / TR 9:25-10:40

This course surveys the history of Russia with emphasis on the modern period. Topics covered include imperialism, absolutism, the Enlightenment, industrialization and its impact, as well as the revolutions and rise of Soviet Russia.

27738Boris Gorshkov / MWF 2:00-2:50

An examination of shifting perceptions of gender and sexuality over the course of United States history; topics include ideas about interracial romance, sex censorship, the eugenics movement, the development of LGBT identities, shifting marital and familial norms, and the development of feminist thought.

27739 / William Kuby / TR 10:50-12:05

The history of China from the founding of the Qing Dynasty. A survey of the Chinese response to imperialism, revolution, political break-up, Japanese invasion, World War II, civil war, and communism. Special attention will be given to China under Mao and the Deng Xiao-Ping reforms that have transformed China into a global industrial power.

27740Fang Yu Hu / TR 12:15-1:30

27742 / Edward Richey / W 5:00-7:30


4000-Level Courses

A seminar primarily intended for advanced majors in history or a related field. Focusing on specific topics in American, European, or World history, the course will help students master topics such as historiographical debate, analysis of historical evidence, and current historical methodologies.

27746James Guilfoyle / R 2:00-4:30


Courses by Subject/Region

U.S. History Courses

A survey of American History from the age of discovery to the present, with special attention to the peoples, ideas, and cultures that created the United States.

23191Stephen Taylor / MWF 8:00-8:50

27730 / TBA / TR 12:15-1:30

20656 / TBA / TR 10:50-12:05

A survey of American History from the age of discovery to the present, with special attention to the peoples, ideas, and cultures that created the United States.

27731Seth Epstein / MWF 9:00-9:50

27754 / TBA / Internet

24474Susan Eckelmann Berghel / TR 9:25-10:40

24475Susan Eckelmann Berghel / TR 10:50-12:05

25484Seth Epstein / MWF 1:00-1:50

27116 / TBA / Internet

27117Seth Epstein / Internet

A study of the political, economic, social, and cultural development of the state from the days of the Indians to the present.

27732David Lee / R 5:30-8:00

An examination of shifting perceptions of gender and sexuality over the course of United States history; topics include ideas about interracial romance, sex censorship, the eugenics movement, the development of LGBT identities, shifting marital and familial norms, and the development of feminist thought.

27739 / William Kuby / TR 10:50-12:05

27742 / Edward Richey / W 5:00-7:30


European History Courses

This class looks at the processes, institutions, and relationships that “made” modern Europe. Special attention will paid to religious, political, economic, and social development in this period of contradiction and intellectual tumult. Topics covered will include artistic, scientific, and religious movements; imperialism and exploration; Absolutism; Constitutionalism, and the Enlightenment.

27735Michelle White / TR 3:05-4:20

This course surveys important themes and developments of European history from the beginning of the French Revolution to approximately the turn of the  twenty-first century. Topics covered may include the balance of power in Europe and international relations; the rise of imperialism; the spread of industrial society; the problems of world wars and reconstruction; the decline of European colonial systems, and the diplomacy of the Cold War.

27736Boris Gorshkov / MWF 1:00-1:50

An exploration of the rise of humanism in fourteenth-century Italy and the spread of humanistic ideas into greater Europe and the responses to it throughout high culture, religion, government, the sciences, and expansion abroad to ca. 1600.

27737Amy Huesman / TR 9:25-10:40

This course surveys the history of Russia with emphasis on the modern period. Topics covered include imperialism, absolutism, the Enlightenment, industrialization and its impact, as well as the revolutions and rise of Soviet Russia.

27738Boris Gorshkov / MWF 2:00-2:50

 

World History Courses

This course will introduce students to human achievements in Eurasia, Africa, and the Americas from the origins of civilization to about the year 1400. Rather than taking a strictly chronological approach to civilizations and cultures, it will emphasize emerging cultures, traditions, and religions both as expressions of their time and place and as meaningful in our modern world.

27717 / James Guilfoyle / TR 8:00-9:15

27718James Guilfoyle / TR 10:50-12:05

27719 / Ruby Choudhury / MWF 8:00-8:50

27720 / Boris Gorshkov / MWF 10:00-10:50

27721Boris Gorshkov / MWF 11:00-11:50

27722 / Kira Robison / MWF 11:00-11:50

27749 / Jeffrey Seagle / Internet

27750 / Jeffrey Seagle / Internet

This course will focus on the evolution of multiple, autonomous cultural centers within Africa, Eurasia, and the Americas prior to 1400 to an interconnected global system in the present. Topics covered include exploration, colonialism, responses to industrialization, the spread of the nation-state, the rise of modern science, the impact of a global economy, ethnicity and nationalism, migration, and mass culture.

27751 / Amy Huesman / Hybrid

27752Boris Gorshkov / Internet

27753Boris Gorshkov / Internet

27723 / Ryan Edwards / TR 12:15-1:30

27724Ryan Edwards / TR 1:40-2:55

27725 / Fang Yu Hu / TR 8:00-9:15

27726Fang Yu Hu / TR 9:25-10:40

27727 / Amanda Shaw / W 5:30-8:00

27728 / Annie Tracy Samuel / MWF 10:00-10:50

27729Annie Tracy Samuel / MWF 11:00-11:50

The history of China from the founding of the Qing Dynasty. A survey of the Chinese response to imperialism, revolution, political break-up, Japanese invasion, World War II, civil war, and communism. Special attention will be given to China under Mao and the Deng Xiao-Ping reforms that have transformed China into a global industrial power.

27740Fang Yu Hu / TR 12:15-1:30

 

Core & Departmental Courses

Introduction to principles and practices of historical research and writing. Emphasizes research methods and techniques, analysis of source material, construction of historical arguments, and effective written presentation of material in multiple contexts.

27733 / Michelle White / TR 9:25-10:40

27734Michelle White / TR 10:50-12:05

A seminar primarily intended for advanced majors in history or a related field. Focusing on specific topics in American, European, or World history, the course will help students master topics such as historiographical debate, analysis of historical evidence, and current historical methodologies.

27746James Guilfoyle / R 2:00-4:30

 

General Education Courses

This course will introduce students to human achievements in Eurasia, Africa, and the Americas from the origins of civilization to about the year 1400. Rather than taking a strictly chronological approach to civilizations and cultures, it will emphasize emerging cultures, traditions, and religions both as expressions of their time and place and as meaningful in our modern world.

27717 / James Guilfoyle / TR 8:00-9:15

27718James Guilfoyle / TR 10:50-12:05

27719 / Ruby Choudhury / MWF 8:00-8:50

27720 / Boris Gorshkov / MWF 10:00-10:50

27721Boris Gorshkov / MWF 11:00-11:50

27722 / Kira Robison / MWF 11:00-11:50

27749 / Jeffrey Seagle / Internet

27750 / Jeffrey Seagle / Internet

This course will focus on the evolution of multiple, autonomous cultural centers within Africa, Eurasia, and the Americas prior to 1400 to an interconnected global system in the present. Topics covered include exploration, colonialism, responses to industrialization, the spread of the nation-state, the rise of modern science, the impact of a global economy, ethnicity and nationalism, migration, and mass culture.

27751 / Amy Huesman / Hybrid

27752Boris Gorshkov / Internet

27753Boris Gorshkov / Internet

27723 / Ryan Edwards / TR 12:15-1:30

27724Ryan Edwards / TR 1:40-2:55

27725 / Fang Yu Hu / TR 8:00-9:15

27726Fang Yu Hu / TR 9:25-10:40

27727 / Amanda Shaw / W 5:30-8:00

27728 / Annie Tracy Samuel / MWF 10:00-10:50

27729Annie Tracy Samuel / MWF 11:00-11:50

A survey of American History from the age of discovery to the present, with special attention to the peoples, ideas, and cultures that created the United States.

23191Stephen Taylor / MWF 8:00-8:50

27730 / TBA / TR 12:15-1:30

20656 / TBA / TR 10:50-12:0

A survey of American History from the age of discovery to the present, with special attention to the peoples, ideas, and cultures that created the United States.

27731Seth Epstein / MWF 9:00-9:50

27754 / TBA / Internet

24474Susan Eckelmann Berghel / TR 9:25-10:40

24475Susan Eckelmann Berghel / TR 10:50-12:05

25484Seth Epstein / MWF 1:00-1:50

27116 / TBA / Internet

27117Seth Epstein / Internet 

A study of the political, economic, social, and cultural development of the state from the days of the Indians to the present.

27732David Lee / R 5:30-8:00

Introduction to principles and practices of historical research and writing. Emphasizes research methods and techniques, analysis of source material, construction of historical arguments, and effective written presentation of material in multiple contexts.

27733 / Michelle White / TR 9:25-10:40

27734Michelle White / TR 10:50-12:05

This class looks at the processes, institutions, and relationships that “made” modern Europe. Special attention will paid to religious, political, economic, and social development in this period of contradiction and intellectual tumult. Topics covered will include artistic, scientific, and religious movements; imperialism and exploration; Absolutism; Constitutionalism, and the Enlightenment.

27735Michelle White / TR 3:05-4:20

This course surveys important themes and developments of European history from the beginning of the French Revolution to approximately the turn of the  twenty-first century. Topics covered may include the balance of power in Europe and international relations; the rise of imperialism; the spread of industrial society; the problems of world wars and reconstruction; the decline of European colonial systems, and the diplomacy of the Cold War.

27736Boris Gorshkov / MWF 1:00-1:50

An examination of shifting perceptions of gender and sexuality over the course of United States history; topics include ideas about interracial romance, sex censorship, the eugenics movement, the development of LGBT identities, shifting marital and familial norms, and the development of feminist thought.

27739 / William Kuby / TR 10:50-12:05