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Composition Course Objectives and Outcomes

 English 1010 and 1011

English 1010 and English 1011 Objectives

  • To practice and develop writing processes pertaining to invention, revision, organization, drafting through multiple drafts, editing, and adjusting for rhetorical context (purpose, audience, persona).
  • To discuss and share writing and reading with one another and develop a shared vocabulary for talking about writing.
  • To practice critical thinking processes such as abstracting, representing, incorporating, and synthesizing the ideas of others through writing.
  • To produce readable and interesting finished products that reflect appropriate academic textual conventions of presentation.

 

English 1010 and 1011 Outcomes

By the end of English 1010 or 1011, each student who earns a C or better will have …

  • Demonstrated and used invention strategies that help writers develop ideas, formulate a thesis, and adjust organization and details for the audience’s needs.
  • Used revision to clarify and/or improve a writing project’s purpose, thesis, organization, use of supporting details, use of source material, and audience awareness.
  • Worked effectively in peer groups to give and receive substantive feedback on emerging drafts.
  • Composed at least two formal writing projects that substantially and effectively synthesize and incorporate texts produced by others. 
  • Used basic multisubject databases such as Academic OneFile to effectively incorporate relevant research into at least two formal assignments.
  • Cited all outside sources correctly and consistently using an accepted and current form of documentation such as MLA or APA style.
  • Used Edited American English in all formal projects. On rare occasions, features of other dialects may be used to serve particular rhetorical purposes. 
  • Completed an acceptable draft of all formal writing projects.  An “acceptable draft” is one that meets minimum assignment criteria to earn a grade of C or better.
  • Revised and edited at least four formal projects for a total of 3750-5000 words (approximately 15-20 double-spaced pages).

 

 

English 1020

English 1020 Objectives

  • Continue developing writing processes pertaining to invention, revision, organization, drafting through multiple drafts, editing, and adjusting for rhetorical context (audience, purpose, persona).  Special emphasis will be placed on more challenging approaches to revision and rhetorical context so that students exercise varied and complex rhetorical options.
  • Continue producing final products that reflect appropriate textual conventions, with special emphasis on generating longer texts for the academic community and other specific audiences.
  • Continue sharing writing and reading with one another as a means of increasing awareness of rhetorical options and of practicing critical readings of both student and college-level texts.  Emphasis will be placed on readings drawn from a variety of nonfiction sources.
  • Continue developing critical thinking processes, with special emphasis on the processes of primary and/or secondary research (how to find, evaluate, and incorporate research).

 

English 1020 Outcomes

At the end of English 1020, each student who earns a C or better will have …

  • Demonstrated and used invention strategies that help writers develop ideas, formulate a thesis, and adjust organization and details for the audience’s needs.
  • Used revision to clarify and/or improve features central to a text’s success such as its purpose, thesis, organization, use of supporting details, use of source material, or audience awareness.
  • Worked effectively in peer groups to give and receive substantive feedback on emerging drafts.
  • Written, via multiple drafts, at least two thesis-driven arguments appropriate for their intended audiences.
  • Developed the ability to refute opposition to his or her argument and concede minor points, when necessary, to build a more effective argument.
  • Demonstrated in writing the ability to effectively negotiate disagreement among experts about a single issue.
  • Developed a sufficient understanding of the UTC Library’s multisubject databases to locate and evaluate sources for reliability and persuasive potential.
  • Demonstrated in writing the ability to accurately represent the main ideas of outside sources.
  • Become familiar with major methods of documentation and gained competency in at least one of those methods such as MLA or APA.
  • Effectively incorporated the ideas of others into one’s writing, negotiating tone and vocabulary as appropriate to maintain a coherent voice.
  • Used personal experience and expert knowledge (outside sources) to argue as appropriate.
  • Demonstrated mechanical and stylistic competency expected of first-year college writers (minimally a mastery of Top 20 Freshman Writing Errors, 2006, which are posted on Blackboard).
  • Revised and edited at least four formal projects for a total of 5000-6000 words (approximately 20-25 double-spaced pages).

 

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