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Dr. Helen Eigenberg
Professor
Criminal Justice
Ph.D. Sam Houston State University, 1989
  Helen-Eigenberg@utc.edu
  (423) 425-4270
  (423) 425-2228
  Davenport 100

Dr. Helen Eigenberg is Professor in the Criminal Justice Department at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga.  She was born and raised in Nebraska.  She received her B.S. and her M.S. from Eastern Kentucky University and her Ph.D. in Criminal Justice in 1989 from Sam Houston State University.  She taught and served as Department Head at Old Dominion University from 1988-1995 and Eastern Kentucky University from 1995-1997.  She has been at UTC since 1998.  Her research interests include women and crime, victimology, violence against women, institutional corrections, and male rape in prisons.  She has published a book on domestic violence:  Woman Battering in the United States (2001).  She also has published over 25 book chapters and articles in a wide variety of journals including: American Journal of Police, Women and Criminal Justice, Criminal Justice Review, Journal of Criminal Justice Education, Journal of Criminal Justice, Justice Quarterly, and The Prison Journal.  She was the Editor of Feminist Criminology for four years, which is an international peer-reviewed journal.  She currently sits on their Editorial Board.   

She has served on the Tennessee State Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence and the Tennessee Victims of Crime State Coordinating Council (2006-2010).  She is the faculty liaison for the Senator Tommy Burks Victim Assistance Academy which provides training for victim advocates throughout the state of Tennessee and is a joint UTC and Tennessee State Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence project.  She also worked closely with the UT Law Enforcement Innovation Center (LEIC), Southeast Command and Leadership College to establish that program in 2000 where she played a significant role in developing the curriculum and overall design of the program.  She continues to serve as a Curriculum Committee Member: (2000-present) for that program and a Board Member and Chair for LEIC.  She wrote and received two National Institute of Justice grants that created the Transformation Project at UTC in 2002.  This project provides educational programming and direct services to victims of domestic and sexual violence, and was the impetus for the current Women’s Center.  She has served as Vice Chair and Executive Counselor for the American Society of Criminology’s (ASC) Division on Women and Crime.  She has received their New Scholar Award (1995), their Inconvenient Woman Award (which recognizes the scholar/activist who has participated in publicly promoting the ideals of gender equality and women’s rights throughout society, particularly as it relates to gender and crime issues), and the Sara Hall Award (for service to the profession).  She was selected as the Eastern Kentucky University, College of Law Enforcement, Distinguished Alumnus in 1994.  In 2000, she received the UTC College of Health and Human Services’ Research Award.  In 2003 and 2005 she was selected for the UTC Grant and Program Review Research Award and in 2006 she received the College of Arts and Sciences Service Award.

Selected Recent Publications:

 Eigenberg, H., Kappeler, V., and McGuffee, K. (2010).  Confronting the Complexities of Domestic Violence:  A Social Prescription for Rethinking Police Training.  Journal of Police Crisis Negotiations, 12 (2), 122-145.

Hensley, C., Eigenberg, H., Gibson, L. (2012). Gay and lesbian inmates: Sexuality and sexual coercion behind bars. In L. Gideon (Ed.), Special needs offenders in correctional institutions (pp. 233-257).  Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Eigenberg, H., McGuffee, K,  Iles, G. and Garland, T. (2012)  Doing Justice: Perceptions of Gender Neutrality in the Jury Selection Process.  American Journal of Criminal Justice. 37, 258-275.

Eigenberg, H. (2012). The National Crime Victimization Survey and Rape: Does it It Really Measure Rape Better Now That it Has Been Re-designed?   In R. Muraskin (Ed.).  It’s a Crime:  Women and Justice 5th Ed (pp. 247-262). New York:  Prentice Hall.

Full vita is available.

 

 

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