Fall 2016 Seminar Schedule

Lunch at 12 PM (University Center)/Seminar at 3 PM (Grote 411, Presentation 3-3:45 PM & Question Sesssion 3:45-4:00 PM)

Date

Speaker

Seminar

September 9, 2016 James Burgess, Bruker Optics Functionalized Graphene Films
September 16, 2016 Patrick Campbell, Aegis Corporation How Mass Spectrometry is Used for Forensic and Clinical Analysis of Drugs of Abuse and the Team Behind the Analysis
September 23, 2016 Stacy Brown, East Tennessee State University Drug Metabolites in Cord Blood: Tools for Predicting Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome
 October 14, 2016 Undergraduate Research Poster Session 2:15 PM - 3:15 PM on the 4th Floor of Grote
October 21, 2016 Angus Wilkinson, Georgia Tech Using chemical insight to design and understand materials with unusual properties: metal fluorides that shrink on heating
 November 11, 2016 Justin Kennemur, Florida State University  

 

Abstracts

James Burgess, Bruker Optics
Functionalized Graphene Films: Graphene, a 2 dimensional carbon material, has garnered much acclaim as a promising material for anything from touch screens to electronics.  However, the lack of a band gap remains a barrier to its implementation in practical semiconductor applications. Functionalization of the material promises a route towards graphene semiconductor.  Fluorine and hydrogen functionalization will be discussed, including routes, verification, and electronic properties of the functionalized materials.

 

Patrick Campbell, Aegis Corporation
How Mass Spectrometry is Used for Forensic and Clinical Analysis of Drugs of Abuse and the Team Behind the Analysis: An overview of forensic and clinical analysis of drugs of abuse including explanation of the principles, practices, and technology.  We will also discuss the various methodologies, instrumentation and regulatory requirements involved.  We will look at the different clients, markets and sample types that make up the bulk of biological analysis for drugs of abuse.  Finally, we will talk about the team that is behind all of the work.

 

Stacy Brown, East Tennessee State University
Drug Metabolites in Cord Blood: Tools for Predicting Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome: Buprenorphine is a semi-synthetic opioid used for the treatment of opioid dependence. Opioid use, including buprenorphine, has been increasing in recent years, in the general population and in pregnant women.  Consequently, there has been a rise in frequency of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), associated with buprenorphine use during pregnancy. The purpose of this study was to investigate correlations between buprenorphine and buprenorphine-metabolite concentrations in cord blood and onset of NAS in buprenorphine exposed newborns.  Liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS) analysis of cord blood concentrations of buprenorphine and metabolites is an effective way to examine drug and metabolite levels in the infant at birth. Cord blood concentrations of the active norbuprenorphine metabolite and the inactive buprenorphine-glucuronide metabolite show promise in predicting necessity of treatment of NAS. These finding have implications in improving patient care and reducing healthcare costs if confirmed in a larger sample.

 

Angus Wilkinson, Georgia Tech
Using chemical insight to design and understand materials with unusual properties: metal fluorides that shrink on heating: Thermal expansion is a phenomenon that chemists do not often consider, and yet it is an important material’s characteristic for many applications. For example, Pyrex is used for laboratory glassware because it has a close to zero thermal coefficient. This makes the glassware resistant to failure when subject to rapid temperature changes. While most materials expand on heating, there are materials that shrink when heated and this unusual property can have value.
The origin of thermal expansion will be explained in terms of the structure, bonding and vibrational motion of solids. The use of this atomistic picture for the design and synthesis of metal fluorides that combine negative thermal expansion (shrinking on heating) with other unusual characteristics such as optical transparency over a wide range of wavelengths, molecular sieving and temperature dependent porosity will be presented.